Autograph Letter Signed 'Rich: Mynshull' to his near relation Edward BLOUNT, (Richard, d. 1730, of Bourton, Buckinghamshire, Jacobite intriguer)

MINSHULL

Publication Date: 1714
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(d. 16th July 1726), of Blagdon, Torbay, Roman Catholic landowner, saying "Least it should appear by further delay that we Prisoners are as neglectful of the world or of our former Acquaintances as They have bine slighting of us", he thanks him for his "favour . of about six weeks since, and likewise the Intimation you gave soe voluntarily of those matters", his earlier comment is only "a reflection on All" who have not answered, and "noe mortification to me. A propos now my hand is In, I aske you what principal and what Interest you have paid to Mr Naish . and how that account does now stand between ye? For depend upon it, I will order it to be discharged or repaid in every particle whether I live or dye: it being soe suitable to my honour", with his service "to yr Lady" (Annabella, e.d. of Sir John Guise, Bart.), 2 facing sides 8vo., address on verso, no place, 16th October It is intriguing to speculate about "those matters", so soon after George I's arrival in Great Britain. There is a long and treasonable letter by Minshull at Windsor (printed in HMC, Stuart Papers III, 1907, pp. 554-556), in several sections of different dates, and in the same hand as the present letter. Richard suggests an alliance by James III with Venice and Turkey, their combined forces to land in Essex and take the Tower and the City of London. The present letter is also signed near the address "Free [postage] Howard". Edward Blount was closely associated with the Howards of Norfolk. On 6th June 1716, he and Lord George Howard, (d. 6th March 1721), eldest half-brother to Henry (1655-1701), 7th Duke of Norfolk, successfully petitioned the House of Lords for counsel to argue against provisions in the Papists' Estates Bill, read 18th May 1716, which threatened to ruin their credit (HMC, Manuscripts of the House of Lords, Vol. 11, 1714-1718, no. 3979, p. 290, Main Papers). Shortly afterwards, Blount took his family to stay in Bruges, but was back by 1721. In 1727, Edward Blount's daughter and co-heiress Mary married Edward (1686-1777), from 1732 9th Duke; and in 1739 another daughter Harriot (d. 1782) married the 9th Duke's brother Philip (1688-1750). (See Kirk's Biographies of English Catholics). Edward's sister Anne married in 1675 Sir Francis Jerningham, 3rd Bart., and his niece Mary married Edward Dicconson. Jerninghams (Jernegans) and Dicconsons feature frequently in the Stuart papers - George Jernegan was James III's agent in Holland, and William Dicconson was treasurer to James III's mother, Mary of Modena. Richard Minshull inherited Bourton in 1684. His grandfather survived spoliation by the Parliamentary forces in 1642 (see VCH III 472) and the family were strong royalists. Richard married in 1686, but lived in great style and was forced to vary his marriage settlement to cover his debts (see HMC, House of Lords papers NS 4 183-184). The fact that Sir Francis Jerningham signed in agreement suggests that Richard's wife Catherine was a Jerningham, confirmed by the bequests in her will (proved 21st March 1739-40). There are several references to her as 'Old Mrs. Minshull' in the Earl of Egmont's diaries, (HMC, 3 vols., 1920-1933), and to the Minshulls' only child Mary ('Mrs. Minshull', d. 17th July 1738). By 1712 Richard was confined to the King's Bench prison, where he died 17th January 1729-30. While there he hoped for a Jacobite restoration, and (from James III) for the Viscountcy said to have been promised by Charles I to his grandfather. G. Sherburn, Correspondence of Alexander Pope, Vol. II (1956), p. 268 and note, says that Richard Minshull and the Earl of Egmont were engaged in prison reform, a burning topic in the 1720s. If so, 'Mr Naish' may well be Hugh Naish senior (d. c. 1733). His son Hugh, (Middle Temple, 1724) was committed to the Fleet Prison for debt on 29th June 1731 and found it best to stay there to avoid payment. An Act was passed allowing creditors from 1st January 1736 to obtain the release of prisoners who could pay, but wh. Bookseller Inventory # 17997

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Title: Autograph Letter Signed 'Rich: Mynshull' to ...
Publication Date: 1714

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