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COLLOT, Georges Henri Victor (1751-1805).

Published by Paris: Arthus Bertrand, 1826 [but printed in 1804-1805]. (1826)

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Item Description: Paris: Arthus Bertrand, 1826 [but printed in 1804-1805]., 1826. 3 volumes. 2 text volumes: 8vo (8 x 5 inches). Half-titles. Half tan calf, marbled boards, gilt (extremities rubbed); preserved in brown morocco backed slipcase and chemise. Atlas: Folio (15 x 12 inches). 4 letterpress leaves including the title-page and plate list in French and English. 11 fine folding engraved maps, 14 engraved plans, and 11 engraved plates (8 views, 3 figures of native Americans), all engraved by Tardieu (folding maps with some very mild offsetting, North America map with slight fold tear, paper flaw to Part II of Ohio River map with small loss to blank area, guards renewed, very mild occasional foxing or marginal spotting, text leaves toned). Contemporary half vellum, marbled paper boards uniform with text volumes, citron and red morocco lettering-pieces on the spine (extremities rubbed). Provenance: John B. Stetson, his sale Parke-Bernet, 14 April 1953, lot 207; sold by Henry Stevens in 1953 to Frank T. Siebert; text volumes purchased by Siebert from Maggs Bros., his sale, Sotheby's New York, Oct 28, 1999, lot 819; with the signed bookplate of Bruce McKinney loosely inserted, his sale 2nd December 2010, lot 150 A PARTICULARLY FINE AND ATTRACTIVE COPY WITH A SUPERB PROVENANCE of the first edition, in French, with the RARE atlas volume which accompanies Collot's account of his extensive survey of the Louisiana region, including his celebrated map on three sheets of the Ohio River. "The beautifully executed map of the Ohio River [on three sheets] depicts vividly the wilderness that this country was at the time of his journey" (Wagner-Camp). The other remarkable maps include a general map of North America; the course of the Ohio from its source to its junction with the Mississippi; the road from Limestone to Frankfort in Kentucky; a stretch of a branch of the river Juniata; a map of the course of the Mississippi from the Missouri to its mouth; a map of Illinois country; a map of the Missouri and of the higher parts of the Mississippi and the plain where the waters divide to run north-east to Hudson's Bay, north-north-west to the Frozen Sea, and south into the gulf of Mexico, and showing Mackenzie's route of 1789; a chart of the sources of the Mobile and of the Yazoo. Fine plans of most important forts are included: Erie, Niagara, Natchez, New Madrid or Anse a la Graisse, and Baton-Rouge. As are plans of the towns of Pittsburgh, St.-Louis, and a sketch of New Orleans. Collot, who served under Rochambeau during the Revolutionary War, was commissioned to make a reconnaissance of the Mississippi valley by Pierre Auguste Adet (1763-1834), French ambassador to the United States. He was to report of the political, economic and military situation in the region, which was under Spanish control, in anticipation of the reacquisition of Louisiana by France from Spain. But as a result of the Louisiana Purchase, however, the "work was printed, both in French . and English, but not published, at the time of Gen. Collot's death, which happened in 1805. More than twenty years afterwards, the whole impression came into the hands of M. Bertrand, an eminent publisher in Paris, who reserved 100 copies of the English and 300 of the French edition, and made waste paper of the remainder" (Rich, Bibliotheca Americana Nova, 2: p. 185). Howes C-601; Sabin 14460; Wagner-Camp 31a. Catalogued by Kate Hunter. Bookseller Inventory # 72lib547

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DUDLEY, Robert 1573-1649.

Published by Firenze: Francesco Onofri, 1646. (1646)

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Item Description: Firenze: Francesco Onofri, 1646., 1646. 2 volumes [of an eventual 3] in one. Folio (13 x 9 4/8 inches). Half-title, title-page dated 1646, with fine engraved vignette of a compass (without half-title and title-page to volume 2, ie Books 3-4, and errata leaf at end, dampstaining to half-title, title-page and folding engraved patent plate, some minor and occasional spotting), folding engraved facsimile of the patent of nobility granted to Dudley in 1620 by Ferdinand II, 15 engraved folding charts in Book 2, including 5 double-sheet, and 66 (of 69) engraved plates by Antonio Francesco Lucini, various sizes, 49 folding, the plates variously numbered (see Phillips), , including 30 plates of astronomical or nautical instrument designs with volvelles, pointers or string-pointers, 7 double-sheet plates of diagrams of ship-building in Book 4, and one very small engraved diagram pasted down in lower margin of folio I2 in Book 4, four plates in Book 1 with letterpress text on versos, 5 inserted unnumbered leaves in Book 3 containing 10 letterpress diagrams of naval formations (without 2 plates in volume one, and one folding plate in Book 4, three plates with tears near the gutter, map of the Americas with small tear at fold juncture, a few of the double-sheet maps slightly browned along sheet junctures from original paste, else EXCEPTIONALLY FINE). Contemporary vellum, manuscript title on spine, edges stained red (a bit creased, especially at the extremities, and with a few pale stains, pastedowns torn). Provenance: with the near contemporary ownership inscription of the library of the Colegio Mayore Cuenca in Salamanca ("En la libreria del Colegio . Cuenca") on the title-page, numbering to the plates, and extensive underscoring and a few marginal notes in red pencil throughout. "THE ONLY EXCEPTION TO THE TOTAL DOMINANCE OF DUTCH SEA ATLAS PRODUCTION." (Burden) First edition of Books 1-4 of an eventual 6 (Books 5 and 6 being published later because the European charts needed updating). Dudley's great, and rare, sea-atlas "Dell' Arcano del Mare" or "Secrets of the Sea", is the first sea-atlas compiled by an Englishman, the first atlas to show the charts constructed on the Mercator projection, the first to show prevailing winds and currents in the principal harbors, and the first to give magnetic declination. The 15 maps in book 2 consist of large-scale maps of the four continents; five relate to the Americas, including "Carta prima Generale d'America." of Central America and Peru with a detailed inset showing the Californian coast, which is the first printed sea chart of the west coast of North America (Burden 266), and "Carta seconda Generale del' America." of the eastern seaboard that is the first printed sea chart by an Englishman of the eastern North American coast, as well as the first to methodically record soundings. The soundings in Chesapeake Bay are recorded only here: they are "curiously lacking in the more detailed chart published in the sixth part. The most interesting area is that of New York where any indication of the Dutch presence is removed" (Burden 267). The Hudson River is named in deference to its discoverer, rather than the Dutch "Noort River". In the dedicatory epistle to the second edition of 1661 the engraver Lucini stated that "he worked on the plates in seclusion for twelve years in an obscure Tuscan village, using no less than 5,000 pounds of copper in the making" (Phillips). The sources for Dudley's maps were clearly wide and varied, his position in society gave him admission to many quarters, and it has been proposed that these include his cousin Thomas Cavendish (the third circumnavigator of the world), it has even been suggested that Dudley had access to Henry Hudson's notes, and Sir Francis Drake's papers, although it is more likely that the charts of John Daniell, that still reside in Florence were the source for the important "Carta prima Generale d'America." Phillips 457; Burden 266-267; Nordenskiöld Collection, 7. Catalogued by Kate Hunter. Bookseller Inventory # 002406

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PURCHAS, Samuel (ca 1575-1626).

Published by London: William Stansby for Henrie Fetherstone, 1625 - 1626. (1626)

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Item Description: London: William Stansby for Henrie Fetherstone, 1625 - 1626., 1626. Together, 5 volumes. Folio (13 x 8 1/8 inches). Additional engraved title-page (re-margined at foot), FINE double-page folding engraved map of "Virginia" by John Smith (21 4/8 x 16 inches to the neatline, 13 6/8 x 17 2/8 inches sheet size), AN EARLY STATE PRECEDING THAT INTENDED FOR PUBLICATION WITH PURCHAS: Church state 4, Burden state 6, with UNUSUALLY WIDE MARGINS SHOWING THE PLATE-MARK (an early repair to verso at the bottom of the centerfold, small hole at the fold, and one or two other separations along the horizontal fold, one or two spots), 6 double-page maps, including "Hondius his Map of the Christian World", 81 maps in the text, engraved and woodcut illustrations, head- and tail-pieces and initials (without 4 leaves: blanks vol. 1 1, vol. 3 [pi]1, and vol. 4 1, and colophon vol. 2 2e4; approximately 30 leaves with small marginal tissue strengthening, approximately 25 leaves with marginal areas renewed, 2 brief marginal worm trails repaired, 2 final leaves repaired affecting a few letters, New England/Canada and Virginia maps strengthened on verso and with short separations, 2 inset maps shaved at fore-edge, a third with hole repaired affecting a few words on verso). Late 19th-century pebble-grained morocco gilt by J. Clarke of Bedford, gilt dentelles (bindings lightly rubbed). Provenance: George Smith, his sale Sotheby's July 1867, lot 6479; John Dunn-Gardner (1811-1903), MP and extensive landowner in Cambridgeshire, England, with his pencilled notes re provenance at the end of volume one; his sale, London, 1854, sold for £75; with the engraved armorial bookplate of Sir Edward Sullivan (1822-1885), who describes this copy in a manuscript note tipped-in at the end: "perhaps the finest extant.it is quite perfect. the Royal Arms were on the old calf covers", his sale, London, June 6, 1890, lot 5146. "One of the fullest and most important collections of early voyages and travels in the English language" (Sabin) First edition of Purchas his "Pilgrimes." and fourth edition of the "Pilgrimage.", issued simultaneously as a supplement. Early issue of "Pilgrimes" with "Hondius his Map of the Christian World" in volume one, pages 65 and 115, 2T6 incorrectly numbered, and the headline on page 704 reading "Hollanders lying devices," but with second issue of engraved title-page, an unusually complete copy, the only significant absence being the colophon to volume 2, which is frequently missing. Second issue of the "Pilgrimage." with dedication to King Charles. Material relating to America begins in book III, about halfway through volume III with an account of George Barkley's travels, accompanied by a map of the arctic regions "Polus Arcticus." . Book IV entitled "English Northerne Navigations, and Discoveries, Relations of Greeneland, Groenland, The North-West Passage, and other Arctike Regions, with later Russian Occurrents" is illustrated with Henry Briggs's double-page map of "The North part of America." This map is best known for being the progenitor of the myth of California as an island, but since it may have been published as early as 1622 it is also proposed as the first map to name "Hudsons bay", "Fretum Hudson", "Hudsons R", "Cape Cod", and "De la war bay" (Burden 314). Book V concerns the "Voyages, and Travels to and in the New World, called America: relations of their Pagan Antiquities and of the regions and plantations in the North and South parts thereof, and of the Seas and Islands adiacent". It is illustrated with "Hondius his Map Of America", "Hondius his Map of Hispaniola, Cuba, &c", "Hondius his Map of Florida", "Hondius his Map of New Spaine", "Hondius his Map of America Meridionalis", "Hondius his Map of the Magellan Streight", and numerous woodcuts of Mexican art and hieroglyphics. The fourth volume, containing books VI to X includes many famous accounts of voyages of exploration to and in the New World, and is famously illustrated with JOHN SMITH'S MAP OF "VIRGINIA", IN AN EARLY STATE PRECEDING THAT INTEND. Bookseller Inventory # 72lib258

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Item Description: London: Printed and sold by R. Sayer & J. Bennett, 1776., 1776. Broadsheets (22 x 16 inches). 30 engraved double and/or folding maps as called for in the "Index", hand-colored in outline, three additionally hand-colored in part, by Henry Mouzon, Joshua Fry & Peter Jefferson, William Scull, Thomas Jefferys, Samuel Holland and others (some light spotting, fore-edge of No. 23 strengthened. Contemporary green morocco-backed, marbled paper boards, gilt (rebacked preserving the original backstrip, extremities a bit scuffed). Second edition, with most maps dated 1775 and maps number 5 and 6 "An Accurate Map of North America" conforming to those of the first edition. After the British victory in the French and Indian War (1756-1763), and under the terms of the 1762 Treaty of Fontainebleau and the Treaty of Paris signed the following year, Britain's colonial Empire now encompassed all land east of the Mississippi River. The potential for trade and development was enormous and the British and their colonists were quick to recognize this. Scientific surveys were undertaken which not only recorded the topography of the land but also information on roads, towns, mills, and any other feature that might be of use. For the first time the interior and not just the coast was explored and mapped, thus extending British knowledge of their new territorial acquisitions as well as the land already in their possession. The resulting maps were generally the best available for their respective areas and for the period. All were published separately by Thomas Jefferys, who as Geographer to the Prince of Wales and later Geographer to the King, was privy to the surveys. In cartographic style and presentation the maps vary greatly, reflecting the many cartographers who compiled them. Together they provided a comprehensive cartographic record of the English colonies by the outbreak of the American Revolution. The decision to issue the maps together in the "American Atlas" was taken by Jefferys's successor Robert Sayer and John Bennett. Public interest in the unrest fermenting in Britain's American colonies as well as military necessity fuelled their decision. Each colony, various other regions and the entire continent were gloriously displayed in exacting detail. Indeed, the maps were so good, they were used by British, American, and French military officers and civil officials during the war. Thus, the importance of this seminal atlas cannot be over emphasized. "The American Atlas" is the single most important cartographic document charting the British colonies at the time of the War for Independence. The maps contained in the America Atlas are the following: Nos. 1-3: A chart of North and South America, including the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, with the nearest coasts of Europe, Africa, and Asia. [Comprehending the Icy-sea, with adjacent coasts of Asia and America, taken from the map published at Petersburg in 1774, by Mr. J. von Staehlin, secretary to the imperial academy] [by John Green. anon.] 1775. 3 maps. No. 4: The Russian discoveries from the map published by the imperial academy of St. Petersburg. 1775. Nos. 5-6: An accurate map of North America, describing. the British and Spanish Dominions. by Eman Bowen . and John Gibson. 1775. 2 maps - Insets: A particular map of Baffin and Hudson's bay. - The passage by land to California discover'd by father Eusebius Francis Kino. . . between the years 1698 and 1701. No. 7: North America from the French of Mr. d'Anville, improved with the English surveys made since the peace. 1775. No. 8: A map of the British empire in North America by Samuel Dunn. . . improved from the surveys of Capt. Carver. 1776. No. 9: An exact chart of the river St. Lawrence, from Fort Frontenac to the island of Anicosti showing the soundings, rocks. . . and all necessary instructions for navigating that river to Quebec. . . by. . . Thos. Jefferys. 1775. Insets: The Seven islands. A continuation of the river from Quebec to lake Ontario taken from the original. . . by Mr. d'Anville. 1755. St. Nicho. Bookseller Inventory # 000370

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WARRE, Henry James (1819-1898).

Published by [London:] Dickinson & Co., [1848.] (1848)

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Item Description: [London:] Dickinson & Co., [1848.], 1848. Broadsheet (21 4/8 x 14 4/8 inches). Publisher's slip advertising binding options tipped-in to first text leaf (without the dedication leaf found in some copies). Lithographed map and 20 FINE tinted lithographed views after Warre on 16 sheets (wear with small losses in margins of text leaves and some guards, some of these with small, old repairs, plates with light wear and light spotting near blank edges, one plate with short marginal tears). Original cloth-backed printed paper wrappers (gutta percha perished leaving all leaves loose, front wrapper chipped and with repaired tear near spine, finger-sized loss to rear wrapper, some soiling) in blue modern clamshell box. Provenance: with the ownership inscription of ?'S.R.G.' on the front wrapper. FIRST EDITION, IN THE ORIGINAL WRAPPERS, OF THIS MAGNIFICENT SERIES OF PACIFIC NORTHWEST VIEWS, including dramatic images of Puget Sound, Mount Hood, and multiple views of the Columbia River and of the Rocky Mountains, most peopled with small figures of Native Americans in the foreground. A few scenes, such as the view of Fort Vancouver, depicted on the same plate with the scene of an "Indian tomb" (a canoe about to be launched on its final voyage), delicately evoke the poignancy of colonization. These are some of the earliest and most beautiful lithographed views of the Rockies and Pacific Northwest. The Oregon country had been "jointly occupied by American and English settlers since 1818; by the 1840s both nations looked to annex the territory to gain an outlet to the Pacific. Spurred by the interests of the Hudson's Bay Company, the British viewed the Columbia River as the appropriate boundary between Canada and northwest America. Expansionists in the United States looked much further north and coined the latitudinal slogan "54º40' or Fight!" In 1845, in anticipation that war might break out in Oregon, Captain Henry James Warre was sent out of Montreal in secret to survey the region. As a British officer, Warre had been trained to sketch the landscape; during the arduous fourteen-month journey by canoe, boat, and horseback, he made more than eighty drawings. By 1846 the crisis was settled by the Oregon Treaty, which fixed the boundary at the 49th parallel. Warre then converted his sketches and notes into a magnificent color plate book, the most important one published on the subject of the Pacific Northwest" (Virginia Historical Society online). Abbey, Travel 656; Graff 4543; Howes W-114 ('the only western color-plates comparable in beauty to those by Bodmer'); Sabin 101455; Smith 10727; Wagner-Camp-Becker 157. Catalogued by Kate Hunter. Bookseller Inventory # 72lib898

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PURCHAS, Samuel (ca 1575-1626).

Published by London: William Stansby for Henrie Fetherstone, 1625 - 1626. (1626)

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Item Description: London: William Stansby for Henrie Fetherstone, 1625 - 1626., 1626. Together, 5 volumes. Folio (13 x 8 2/8 inches). Additional engraved title-page, FINE double-page engraved map of "Virginia" by John Smith (13 x 14 2/8 inches, close cropped along the lower and right edges into the plate-mark), Burden 164 state 10, 7 double-page maps (map of China repeated), including "Hondius his Map of the Christian World", 81 engraved vignette maps in the text, 7 engraved vignettes in the text and woodcut illustrations throughout, head- and tail-pieces and initials (without initial blanks, 2 text leaves with short tears). Modern fine binding of mottled brown morocco by Trevor Lloyd, the covers ruled in blind, the spines in six compartments with five rasied bands, red morocco lettering-pieces in one, the others decorated with fine gilt tools. Provenance: 19th-century pencilled annotations to margins throughout. "One of the fullest and most important collections of early voyages and travels in the English language" (Sabin) First edition of Purchas his "Pilgrimes." and fourth edition of the "Pilgrimage.", issued simultaneously as a supplement. This issue of "Pilgrimes" with "Hondius his Map of the Christian World" in volume one on page 115 only, 2T6 incorrectly numbered, the headline on page 704 reading "Hollanders lying devices, to disgrace the English", with the colophon to volume 2, which is frequently missing, but with second issue of engraved title-page. Second issue of the "Pilgrimage." with dedication to King Charles. Material relating to America begins in book III, about halfway through volume III with an account of George Barkley's travels, accompanied by a map of the arctic regions "Polus Arcticus." . Book IV entitled "English Northerne Navigations, and Discoveries, Relations of Greeneland, Groenland, The North-West Passage, and other Arctike Regions, with later Russian Occurrents" is illustrated with Henry Briggs's double-page map of "The North part of America." This map is best known for being the progenitor of the myth of California as an island, but since it may have been published as early as 1622 it is also proposed as the first map to name "Hudsons bay", "Fretum Hudson", "Hudsons R", "Cape Cod", and "De la war bay" (Burden 314). Book V concerns the "Voyages, and Travels to and in the New World, called America: relations of their Pagan Antiquities and of the regions and plantations in the North and South parts thereof, and of the Seas and Islands adiacent". It is illustrated with "Hondius his Map Of America", "Hondius his Map of Hispaniola, Cuba, &c", "Hondius his Map of Florida", "Hondius his Map of New Spaine", "Hondius his Map of America Meridionalis", "Hondius his Map of the Magellan Streight", and numerous woodcuts of Mexican art and hieroglyphics. The fourth volume, containing books VI to X includes many famous accounts of voyages of exploration to and in the New World, and is famously illustrated with JOHN SMITH'S MAP OF "VIRGINIA". John Smith's map of "Virginia" "one of the most important printed maps of America ever produced and certainly one of the greatest influence. It became the prototype for the area for half a century until Augustine Herman's map of 1673. First issued separately in London, it accompanied many editions of various publications for another twenty years. It, therefore, was seen widely and inspired much interest in the fledgling Virginia colony, influencing considerably its eventual success. Consequently the east coast of North America became dominated by the English. To this day the map is still used by archeologists to locate native India villages. It records 166 of them" (Burden 164). Also featured is Sir William Alexander, Earl of Stirling's map of New France, New Scotlande and New Englande (Burden 208). First published in 1624 to accompany his "An Encouragement to Colonies", this is an important map as it records the twenty names of patentees granted land between 40 and 48 degrees north latitude, stretching from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean, and including the. Bookseller Inventory # 72lib1302

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Norton Bush (1834-1894)

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Item Description: No Binding. Book Condition: Very Good. Norton Bush (1834-1894) Scene on the Upper Guayaquil River Signed, dated 1880 at lower right Inscribed with title on stretcher Oil on canvas 20” x 36,” 30” x 46” framed Provenance: Private Collection, San Francisco, CA Born in Rochester, New York, in 1834, Norton Bush first studied art in his native town as the pupil of James Harris, an established landscape painter. In 1850, Bush moved to New York and studied with the Hudson River School painter Jasper Cropsey (1823-1900). At the suggestion of the artist Frederic Church (1826-1900), Bush decided to travel to look for inspiration for his paintings. In 1853, Bush left New York for San Francisco by boat, crossing America through Nicaragua on the old “Vanderbuilt” route used by many Gold Rush prospectors and poineers, as the transcontinental railroad would not be complete until 1869. Bush settled in San Francisco and became part of the growing art community in the city in the 1860s. After a sketching tour to Central America in 1868, Bush increasingly turned to tropical subjects, which were very popular in San Francisco. A majority of San Francisco residents before 1869 had experienced a taste of the tropics in their pioneer journey to California, and Bush’s transcriptions of the lush beauty of the region evoked nostalgic memories. Additionally, many Hudson River school painters, such as Frederic Church, had started to travel and paint scenes from South America and other tropical areas. Norton Bush became the most popular, and best known nationally, of the artists who settled in California and specialized in landscapes of the tropics. Bush’s favorite subject was the tropical lagoon framed by palm trees. He was a master at capturing the soft harmonies of sunset in the tropics and their reflections in still water. Describing Bush’s tropical scenes, a San Francisco Evening Post art critic wrote: Not only is the vegetation splendidly tinted, but the atmosphere is warm, soft and golden, and the water as perfectly represented as can be imagined Mr. Bush occupies a leading position as an American artist and the newspapers of New York and other Eastern cities have often referred to his paintings in terms of a warm eulogy. (October 27, 1874) In 1875 Bush traveled to South America on a commission from Henry Meiggs, a mining and railroad entrepreneur whom had moved there from San Francisco. Bush visited Peru, Chile and Ecuador, taking studies for works like this tranquil scene that depicts the Guayaquil River in Ecuador. In 1878 Bush became director of the San Francisco Art Association, and in the following years won four gold medals at California State Fair exhibitions for his paintings of the tropics. In later years, Bush took to painting marine scenes, which lacked the popularity of his tropical views. In 1893, Bush was put in charge of the California section of the Columbian Exposition in Chicago. The strenuous efforts of this were too much for his health, and he died in Oakland in April, 1894. Works by Norton Bush can be found in the collections of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Oakland Museum of California. Signed by Illustrator(s). Bookseller Inventory # H00201c

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Autograph letter signed.: Darwin, Charles, English

Darwin, Charles, English naturalist (1809-1882).

Published by Down, Beckenham, Kent, 11 Nov. [1870]. (1870)

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Item Description: Down, Beckenham, Kent, 11 Nov. [1870]., 1870. 8vo. 3 pp on bifolium. On Darwin's embossed letterhead (Down, Bromley, Kent, S.E.) with "Bromley" crossed out and changed to "Beckenham" in Darwin's hand. To Philip Lutley Sclater, who has been reading the proofs of Darwin's "Descent of Man", describing the ornithologist William Henry Hudson (1841-1922) as "a hater of evolution": "I will most gladly accept your kindness. I look at the delay caused as nothing comparatively to the great benefit. I never expected or hoped for many criticisms, but I still hope you will point out any serious error, whatever trouble this may cause to my Printers. I suppose I shall soon receive Revises, but Messrs Clowes [the printers of The Descent of Man] sometimes delay the 2d proofs till 23 of a whole vol. is corrected in first proof. - Mr Hudson's paper is very interesting & it pleases me to see so staunch a hater of evolution a little staggered at the end of his paper [.] I will not now waste quite so much time in trying to find every name quoted in some book; so you will doubly help me". - One of the earliest known examples of the use of the term "evolution" in the Darwinian sense, pre-dating its first appearance in print in "The Descent of Man". Although the term had long been in use in embryology, having been introduced with a specific meaning in 1762 by Charles Bonnet in his "Considerations sur les corps organisées", its use had been avoided by Jean-Baptiste Lamarck in his 1809 work, "Philosophie Zoologique"; likewise, Darwin long resisted its use in the field of ontogenesis (biological development), preferring instead the phrase "descent with modification". In the last sentence of the first edition of "Origin" (1859), Darwin did use the verb "evolved" ("From so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved"), but he had still not yet settled on the term "evolution" to articulate his most important theory. In 1862, three years after the publication of "Origin", Herbert Spencer provided his own ontogenetic definition of the term in "First Principles": "Evolution is a change from an indefinite, incoherent homogeneity, to a definite, coherent heterogeneity; through continuous differentiations and integrations." This definition failed to grasp a principle that Darwin had already recognised - that of adaptive complexity, or the idea that natural selection will tend to favour the evolution of new, specialised varieties. It was this feature that distinguished Darwin's theory from that of Lamarck, as well as from those of Spencer and other contemporaries, and which would become the central organizing principle that biologists use to understand the world. - The word "evolution" occurs for the first time in any of Darwin's printed works in "The Descent of Man" (vol. 1, p. 2), first published on 24 February 1871; Darwin then uses it - as a noun - in the revised 6th edition of "Origin" (published on 19 February 1872). - Original folds, a few toning spots, otherwise fine. Provenance: collection of Sir Edward Ford (1902-86), distinguished physician and philanthropist, Sydney; believed to have been acquired by Ford in London in the 1960s, from either Maggs Bros. or Winifred Myers. Accompanying this Darwin letter is a photocopy of a handwritten letter addressed to Sir Edward Ford from Dr. David Kohn, associate editor of The Collected Letters of Charles Darwin (later the Darwin Correspondence Project), dated 30 January 1978 and asking for copies of the Darwin letters in his collection and his permission for them to be published. Darwin Correspondence Project, no. 7366. Bookseller Inventory # 46975

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Dobbs, Arthur, [attributed to].

Published by London: Printed for J. Robinson (1749)

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Item Description: London: Printed for J. Robinson, 1749. Hardcover. Book Condition: Fine. No Jacket. 1st Edition. ". from the observations made on board the ships sent upon the late discovery ; supported by affidavits, which coincides with several former accounts : humbly offered to the consideration of Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament." First edition. 8vo., 23 pp., 3/4 polished mottled calf and cloth in the old style. Dobbs' theory on the location of the Northwest Passage, with affidavits of Henry Ellis and Jeremiah Westall on conditions around Hudson Bay. If not authored directly by Dobbs, the pamphlet at least closely allies itself with Dobbs' position. A very fine copy, of a very rare book. See Christie's sale #1820, 16 - 17 April 2007 The Frank S. Streeter Library. References: Alden & Landis 749/226; JCB (3) III:904; Sabin 68291; Staton & Tremaine/TPL 216; Streeter sale VI:3643. Bookseller Inventory # t-55

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An Account of a Voyage for the: DRAGE, Theodore, or

DRAGE, Theodore, or Charles SWAINE]

Published by Sold by Mr. Jolliffe [and others], London (1748)

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Item Description: Sold by Mr. Jolliffe [and others], London, 1748. 2 volumes, 8vo. (7 3/4 x 4 7/8 inches). [2], vii, [1], 237, [1]; [2], 328, 313-326, [18]pp. 10 engraved maps and plates. Contemporary speckled calf, spine with raised bands in six compartments, brown and black morocco lettering pieces in the second and third compartments, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt (expert repairs at joints) Provenance: Marinens Bibliotek (small inked stamp on the title) A rare and important narrative of an early exploratory expedition in Hudson's Bay in search of the Northwest Passage. The privately-financed expedition was dispatched by the North West Committee in 1746 as part of an attempt to verify the assertions of Arthur Dobbs in the quest for a passage. The two ships which made up the expedition, the Dobbs Galley and the California examined Wager Bay and wintered at the Hudson's Bay Company's York Factory. Streeter describes this anonymously authored work, which is rarely seen on the market, as a "significant item in the literature relating to attempts at finding the Northwest Passage . it tells of a voyage undertaken to sustain Arthur Dobbs' claim that a northwest passage existed leading from Hudson's Bay." The outcome was to prove the opposite. Accounts of the voyage are found in two rival narratives published soon after the return of the expedition. Henry Ellis sailed aboard the Dobbs Galley and published his Voyage to Hudson's Bay in 1748. The present anonymous account written by "the Clerk the California" has been variously attributed to Charles Swaine or Theodore Drage. The account includes important descriptions and illustrations of the manners and customs of the native Americans. The maps comprise: The Northern Ocean; Hudson's Straits and Bay; Hudson's Streights and Bay, of Davis Streights, and Baffin's Bay; The West and North-West parts of Hudson's Bay; Hudson's Bay according to the discoveries in the years 1746 & 1747; Chart for the better understanding of De Font's letter. Streeter 3640; European Americana 748/54; Sabin 82549; TPL 206; JCB (3)I:872. Bookseller Inventory # 33865

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Item Description: [Farmington, Connecticut, 1841. Manuscript on laid, watermarked paper; 11 leaves and 10 additional leaves (6 x 4-1/2 inches) loosely inserted, being a total of 21 leaves containing approx. 26 unfoliated pages of ink manuscript. Nineteen and a half leaves excised from the bound notebook, an apparently re-purposed account book; the notebook was inverted and the remaining leaves were used to record the present journal. The additional, loosely inserted leaves conclude the journal begun in the notebook. 8vo, approx. 7-1/4 x 4-3/4 in inches. Elijah Porter's journal of his American Revolutionary War service covers a three-year period, May 1777 to May 1780, and is so arranged as to provide a vivid narrative of the leading incidents and campaigns during his military service in New York and New Jersey. It is a narrative more than a mere daily accounting. Porter served in General Israel Putnam's Division of the Connecticut Line, under General George Washington's command.The main events chronicled by Porter include the Battles of Fort Montgomery, Monmouth, and Stony Point. He describes the capture and execution of two spies, an attempt to kidnap Washington, the arrest of American General Charles Lee by Washington in the field at Monmouth, an African American servant's single-handed capture of a British officer, and Washington's tearful solicitude for his troops during the harsh winter encampment at Morristown. Some of the other persons discussed by Porter include American General Anthony Wayne, the "Hored Trayter [Benedict] Arnold," and American ally, "Barren Stuben [Baron von Steuben] the Old Prussian Drummer."Porter, of Farmington, Connecticut, enlisted in May 1777 and first served in the Hudson River Valley in New York. The journal of his three years' military service in the American Revolution begins with accounts of two separate incidents there concerning the arrests, trials, and executions of two British spies in September and October of 1777. Porter begins by providing a gripping description of his having to hold down a distraught kneeling British officer convicted of espionage so that the officer could be shot to death. He has to leap away as the officer is shot.A description of the dramatic discovery and subsequent hanging of another spy near Fishkill, New York follows: "[O]ur patrolling party discovered a man making towards the [British] Fleet, they took him up and brought him before a Court & one of the guards testified he saw a stranger put something in his mouth whereupon the surgeon gave him an emetic which brought up a silver ball and in it a letter from Burgoine [British General John Burgoyne] to Genl. [Sir Henry] Clinton to hasten on for his relief, the Court passed the sentence of Death and in an hour he was swinging under the Gallows" (pp. [2-3]).Porter also writes about the British plan to capture George Washington across the river from West Point. A servant girl in a house where Washington was attending a ball detected the plot to kidnap General Washington and take him to New York. The servant warned Washington's guard who: "?place[ed] themselves in the bottom of the Boat and kept still, the night was dark, but the sentry soon discovered a boat approaching but they kept still untill the enemy landed, they then arose and sprang ashore and captured all the enemy and brought them withGenl. Washington over to West Point in safety[.] not long after this the report was that the British Army at Philadelphia under Genl. Howe was on their way to N. York & Genl Washington was making all the preparation he could to capture the whole army"(pp. [8-9]).The most moving account within Porter's Journal of a Revolutionary Soldier is of the hardships endured by Washington's army during their harsh winter encampment at Morristown, New Jersey in 1779 and 1780.Porter's description of a sleepless Washington wading through the snow, tearfully comforting his hungry troops is particularly affecting: "[O]n the 5th day very early in the morning, before sun rising, there was so. Bookseller Inventory # 255922

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Breeden-Raedt aende Vereenichde Nederlandse Provintien. Gelreland. Holland.

Item Description: Soft cover. Book Condition: Very Good. Antwerpen, Francoys van Duynen, 1649. 24 leaves, small 4to. No wrappers, later paper spine. Two round stains at the bottom of title and first text leaf, else a very good copy. The pamphlet comes in a fine recent marbled board folding case. **** This is the first separate publication on New Netherland. In 1649, delegates were sent from New Netherland to Holland to express grievances against the government about the treatment of the colonists. The anonymously published pamphlet "Breeden Raedt" brought these grievances to the public. It is composed as a dialogue between several fictional persons and strongly attacks the administrations of Directors William Kieft and Peter Stuyvesant. The chief speaker is a Dutch "Schipper", who had been in New Netherland. It is very evident, however, that the real narrator was not a mere skipper of a merchant vessel. He was intimately acquainted with the details of local politics of New Netherland and evidently personally unfriendly both to Kieft and Stuyvesant. For a long time, scholars therefore agreed that the pamphlet must have been written by Cornelis Melyn,who was born in Antwerp and played an important role in the early rise of the colony. He was imprisoned and banned by Stuyvesant. **** The roughly-translated title "Broad Advice" is taken from the naval term used to advise in case of danger or emergency. The pamphlet introduces a total of ten voices: a Portuguese soldier in the service of the Company, the captain of a ship, a Swedish student, a Spanish barber, a French merchant, a Neapolitan, a German gentleman, a poor English nobleman, a boatswain and Polander. With these men as spokesmen, the agents and officers of the Dutch West India Company in Brazil and New Netherland are arraigned, and harshest criticism is reserved for Kieft and Stuyvesant. The tone is coarse and critical. The text is often very graphic in its depiction of violence in the colony, with details of kidnappings and murders, massacres and torture. The work details Kieft's brutal treatment of the local Indians and the Pavonia and Corlears Hook massacres. "Equally unflattering accounts are given of his successor, Stuyvesant, mentioning the incident of losing his leg at the siege of St. Martin in the West Indies, and giving instances of his arrogant and intransigent behavior as governor" (Lathrop Harper, cat. 201, item 415). Important references to Dutch interests in Brazil are included. **** Asher, In his "Bibliographical and historical essay on the Dutch books and Pamphlets relating to New Netherland" entirely devotes pp. 183-198(!) to this pamphlet, which he claims to have discovered (or at least, discovered its historical importance) in 1849. An English translation was made for the first time by F.W. Cowan and included in Müller's "Catalogue of books relating to America" (Amsterdam, 1850). In 1854, Henry C. Murphy published a full translation of the pamphlet (Vertoogh van Nieu Nederland and Breeden Raedt, New York, privately printed). Asher argued that Melyn could not have been the work's author. The title-page ascribes authorship to "I.A." followed by the initials "G.W.C." "The only person prominent enough in New Amsterdam and whose name fits the initials, was Isaac Allerton, one of the Eight Men, but it seems inconceivable that he had anything to do with the composition of the tract. The initials 'G.W.C.' may well mean Geoctroyeerde West-Indische Compagnie, and are probably added to make it appear that the tract was composed by someone officially connected with the West India Company" (Stokes). Until today, there are no definitive clues to prove authorship of the pamphlet.**** EXCEEDINGLY RARE. Last copy sold in auction: 1967, Streeter sale. Müller priced his copy at the then enormous sum of $250 in 1850. Henry C. Murphy, who made a new translation for James Lenox (published in 1854), sold his copy at auction in 1884 for $100. AldenL 649/32; Asher 334; Bell B485; JCB (3) II:382; Sabin 26272; Stokes IconVI:259. Bookseller Inventory # 123985

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Etudes d’arbres asiatiques: MILBERT, Jacques-Gérard

MILBERT, Jacques-Gérard

Published by Henry Gaugain & Cie (1828)

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Item Description: Henry Gaugain & Cie, 1828. Couverture rigide. Book Condition: Bon. MILBERT, Jacques-Gérard. Etudes d’arbres asiatiques. A Paris, chez Henry Gaugain & Cie, Rue de Vaugirard N°34 et Rue Vivienne N°2, sd (1828) Un volume grand in-plano (635x495mm). Couverture lithographiée. Très rare album composé de 12 lithographies grand in-folio par Henry Gaugain, représentant des arbres. On trouve dans cette collection : 1. Cocotier – 2. Fougère en arbre – 3. Papayer – 4. Bois d’ébène [et] Fougère arbre – 5. Jeune manguier – 6. Bois noir-Mimosa (Acacia de Malabar) – 7. L’arbre à pain – 8. Palmier Arequier – 9. Palmier cocotier – 10. Vieux manguier – 11. Bananier – 12. Bois de thek. Jacques-Gérard Milbert (1766-1840), peintre et naturaliste français, accompagne en 1800 comme dessinateur en chef, l’expédition scientifique dirigée par le capitaine Baudin dans les terres australes. Forcé par une maladie de s’arrêter à l’Ile de France quelques mois à peine après le début de l’expédition, il emploie les deux années qu’il y passe en études physiques, géologiques On lui doit son récit de voyage publié en 1812 à Paris Voyage pittoresque à l’île de France, au Cap de Bonne-Espérance et à l’île Ténériffe. En 1815, il part pour les Etats-Unis où il se consacre pendant sept ans à des recherches d’histoire naturelle. Il est l’un des premiers à alerter sur les dégâts liés au développement, et dans son Itinéraire pittoresque du fleuve Hudson et des parties latérales de l'Amérique du nord publié à Paris en 1828-1829 (2 volumes et un atlas), il écrit « Mais il est un point où dans chaque canton le défrichement doit s’arrêter, si l’on veut, en peu d’années, voir se succéder à un pays verdoyant et fertile, une terre aride et dépouillée. » L’ouvrage ici présent est fort rare. Le seul exemplaire complet recensé se trouve à la BnF, un autre incomplet se trouve à la Harvard University. Petites restaurations habiles en marge à quelques planches, traces d’écriture sur le premier plat. Bookseller Inventory # ABE-1494343415347

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LAET, Johannes de (1593-1649).

Published by Leiden: Elzevir, 1630. (1630)

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Item Description: Leiden: Elzevir, 1630., 1630. Folio (12 ¼ x 7 ¾ inches). Engraved title-page (lower edge frayed), 14 folding maps (lightly browned, some staining and one or two short marginal tears affecting the image of "Straet van Magallanes" (lacking half-title). Contemporary vellum over paste-board, yapp fore edges, gilt-lettered green paper label on the spine (label chipped, generally a bit soiled, one or two worm holes, extremities rubbed, endpapers renewed). Provenance: occasional contemporary underscoring. "IT IS ARGUABLY THE FINEST [ATLAS] PUBLISHED IN THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY" (Burden) Second, expanded edition of one of the most important of seventeenth-century New World voyages collections, compiled by a director of the recently formed Dutch West India Company, Johannes de Laet (1581-1649). Including for the first time four American regional maps: "Americae sive Indiae Occidentalis", the best West Coast delineation to date, and interestingly depicting California as a peninsula not an island, and stopping short of the controversial region of the North West Passage; "Nova Francia et Regiones Adiacentes", one of the foundation maps of Canada, the first printed map to include an accurate depiction of Prince Edward Island, and the earliest of a north-south oriented Lake Champlain, and still relied upon by Blaeu in 1662 and Coronelli in the 1690s; "Nova Anglia" is of "extreme importance being the first printed one to use the names "Manbattes" (Manhattan), and "N. Amsterdam", or New York, founded in 1626. It is also the earliest to use the Dutch names of "Noordt Rivier" and "Zuyd Rivier", for the Hudson and Delaware Rivers respectively, as well as the Indian "Massachusetts", for the new English colony" (Burden); and "Florida, et regions vicinae" a largely derivative map with one notable alteration in the "placing of "C.Francois" further east into the Atlantic Ocean. Florida, as we know it today, is here called "Tegesta Provinc." This name, applied here for the first time, is that of a tribe of Indians living on the south-west coast. "Florida" was at this time applied to a far larger region" (Burden). De Laet was born in Antwerp but in 1585, the family, like thousands of Flemish protestants, fled to the northern Netherlands. After studying philosophy in Leiden the young de Laet traveled to London in 1603, obtained his denizenship, but after the death of his wife returned to Leiden, where in April 1608 he "married Maria Boudewijns van Berlicum (d. 1643). There he made a fortune through overseas trade and land investments, at home and at Laetburg, near Albany, in New Netherland. In 1619 he was appointed a director of the Dutch West Indies Company, a position he held until his death. "In the ongoing religious quarrels which troubled Holland, de Laet sided with the counter-remonstrants (Gomarists) against the remonstrants (Arminians), an allegiance evident in his 'Commentarii de Pelagianis et Semi-Pelagianis' (1617). In 1618 he was delegated for Leiden to the Synod of Dort, where he befriended the theologian Samuel Ward, master of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, one of the several English delegates. In his leisure time he proved a prolific, many-sided scholar with a keen interest in theology, geography, botany, classical philology, and comparative historical linguistics. Still of importance are his lavishly illustrated books on the Americas—'Nieuwe wereldt' (1625), which he also translated into Latin (1633) and French (1640) [as here], a detailed account of the early years of the 'Dutch West Indies Company' (1644), and 'Historia naturalis Brasiliae' (1648). He contributed eleven volumes to the Elzevier 'Respublicae' series, including ones on Scotland and Ireland (1627), England (1630), and India (1631). In a magisterial polemic with Hugo Grotius, he disproved Grotius's claims that the Native Americans originated from China, Ethiopia, and Norway (1644). His de luxe edition of Vitruvius's 'De architectura' (1649) includes his Latin translation of Sir Henry Wotton's 'The Ele. Bookseller Inventory # 002122

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BRIGGS, Henry (1561-1631).

Published by London: William Stanley for Henrie Featherstone, 1625-1626. (1626)

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Item Description: London: William Stanley for Henrie Featherstone, 1625-1626., 1626. The north part of America conteyning Newfoundland, New England, Virginia, Florida, New Spaine and Nova Francia, with ye rich Iles of Hispaniola, Cuba, Jamaica and Porto Rieco on the south and upon ye west the large and goodly island of California. The bonds of it are the Atlantick Ocean on ye South and East sides ye south sea on ye west side and on ye North Fretum Hudson and Buttons baye a faire entrance to ye nearest and most temperate passage to Japan & China Single sheet, float-mounted and framed (12 4/8 x 14 inches, full margins showing the plate mark; framed size 21 4/8 x 23 4/8 inches). A fine engraved map of North and most of Central America by Reynold Elstracke, the title within an elegant mannerist cartouche upper right, notably showing California as an Island. Published in Samuel Purchas's 'Purchas his Pilgrimes', 1625, in Book IV to illustrate "English Northerne Navigations, and Discoveries, Relations of Greeneland, Groenland, The North-West Passage, and other Arctike Regions, with later Russian Occurrents" and is best known for being the PROGENITOR OF THE MYTH OF CALIFORNIA AS AN ISLAND, but since it may have been published as early as 1622 it is also proposed as the first map to name "Hudsons bay", "Fretum Hudson", "Hudsons R", "Cape Cod", and "De la war bay" (Burden 314). 'Purchas his Pilgrimes' was a great geographical collection and a continuation and enlargement of Hakluyt's 'The Principal Navigations'. When Hakluyt died he left a large collection of voyages in manuscript which came into the hands of Purchas, who added to them many more voyages and travels. As an editor and compiler, Purchas sought to interest the general public of his day in the dramatic geographical discoveries that had taken place with remarkable rapidity over the previous 140 years. During a time when travel literature had the patriotic purpose of inspiring Englishmen to engage in overseas expansion and enterprise, his collections were read with enthusiasm. 'Purchas his Pilgrimes' and the maps it included have a momentous historical significance, for they are frequently the only sources of information on important questions relating to geographical history and early exploration. Henry Briggs, a noted scholar and mathematician of the time, his map, engraved by Reynold Elstracke, is desirable today as the first map to show California as an island, a geographic misconception that endured for centuries and has inspired numerous books and generations of map collectors. The map contains three legends including "California sometymes supposed to be a part of ye westerne continent, but scince by a Spanish Charte taken by ye Hollanders it is found to be a goodly Ilande". The map notes the expedition to the west coast of Sebastian Vizcaino in 1602-1603, possibly showing P.S. Diego and S. Clement for the first time. It was Friar Antonio de la Ascension' account of that expedition which is believed to be the source of the theory of California as an Island. The map was also one of the first to propagate rumors of the existence of a Northwest Passage, based on the accounts of recent explorations. The map’s text promises that Hudson’s Strait and Button’s Bay provide a "fair entrance" to the South Sea -- in other words, they are the gateway of the passage. This map, widely followed by later mapmakers, truly deserves the attention it has received. The concept it spread of California being an island took hold among even the most sophisticated mapmakers. Although it was refuted by Father Kino in 1698 when he traveled to the west coast of California, it still took a royal decree from Ferdinand VII of Spain in 1747 to finally persuade cartographers to alter their delineations. Bookseller Inventory # 72map282

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Item Description: London, 1779. Engraved and aquatint map, period hand colouring. 14 lettered references, large inset with title as above. Rare revolutionary chart of the Hudson River showing the American defenses, on the eve of the Battle of Fort Montgomery. On October 6, 1777, a British force led by Lieutenant General Sir Henry Clinton attacked Forts Montgomery and Clinton from the landward side, where the American defenses were only partially completed. Support from cannon fire from British ships on the Hudson River that had passed through the chevaux de frise on the lower river. By the end of the day, both forts had fallen to the British, who burned the forts and tore down the stonework buildings. However, the battle was a pyrrhic victory for the British. The campaign against the forts caused delays in reinforcing General John Burgoyne at Saratoga, where Americans forced the British surrender ten days later at the Battle of Saratoga before Clinton's forces could arrive. The present map, which depicts the Forts and the River defenses prior to the battle, is from The Atlantic Neptune , the finest large scale sea atlas of the United States and Canadian Atlantic coastline ever produced. The maps in the atlas were produced over a seven-year period (1775-82), and are well known for their accurate portrayal of various sounds, bays, bars, harbors as well as navigational hazards. This atlas was used extensively by the Royal Navy during the American Revolution. Des Barres studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. On the outbreak of the Seven Years war in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to be his aide-de-camp. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St.Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast and further south. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on the Neptune. His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The Atlantic Neptune was the first British sea atlas of her North American colonies, and one of the most important achievements of eighteenth century cartography. With an official commission from the Royal Navy, Des Barres published the first volume in London in 1775, which was soon followed by further volumes. Des Barres' monumental endeavor eventually featured over two-hundred charts and aquatint views, many being found in several states. All of the charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information. The Neptune met with the highest acclaim from the beginning, and is today widely regarded as superior to all other atlases produced during its time. Henry Stevens identified only a single state of this chart, issued coloured or uncoloured, which appeared in some examples volume four, part two of the Atlantic Nepture; the map, however, is not listed in the engraved list of maps for that section, and given the rarity was likely not issued in all copies. National Maritime Museum: Henry Stevens Collection: HNS156; Cf. Phillips, Atlases 1198; Hornsby, Surveyors of Empire: Samuel Holland, J.F.W. Des Barres and the Making of the Atlantic Neptune (2011). Bookseller Inventory # 33200

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DUDLEY, Robert (1573-1649).

Published by [Florence: 1646 or later]. (1646)

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Item Description: [Florence: 1646 or later]., 1646. Two sheets, joined (19 2/8 x 30 inches to the neat line, full margins showing the plate mark), matted. Fine engraved map showing the coasts of India and Sumatra, with fine cursive lettering, the title in an elaborate cartouche of fish, decorated with a compass rose and two-masted ship. Exceptionally fine engraved map from "Dell'arcano del mare", THE FIRST ENGLISH NAUTICAL ATLAS AND THE FIRST MARITIME ATLAS TO USE THE MERCATOR PROJECTION. Robert Dudley's "Secrets of the Sea" is "ONE OF THE GREATEST ATLASES OF THE WORLD and one of the most complex ever produced: it is the first sea-atlas of the whole world; the first with all the charts constructed using Mercator's new projection, as corrected by Edward Wright; the first to give magnetic declination; the first to give prevailing winds and currents. the first to expound the advantages of "Great Circle Sailing"; and . the first sea-atlas to be compiled by an Englishman." (Lord Wardington). Dudley's monumental work was the only exception to the total dominance of sea-atlas production by the Dutch for nearly a century. The complete work contained nearly 150 sea charts as well as dozens of illustrations and working diagrams. It was superior to any previous work in that the charts illustrated the whole world, the first time any outside of Europe had been included. His atlas was also the first to importantly show the prevailing winds, currents and magnetic deviation. In using the projection developed by Mercator, Dudley improved upon the theory of navigating by the "Great Circle," the shortest distance between two points on a globe. It was not until the eighteenth century that cartographers used the projection consistently, and during the prolonged period when the Dutch dominated cartographic production, not one atlas was published using it. This magnificently engraved work is an encyclopedia of seventeenth-century knowledge regarding the seas. Dudley was one of the more colorful and adventurous characters in the history of mapmaking. The illegitimate son of the Earl of Leicester and Lady Douglas Sheffield, but unable to establish his claim to the title of Earl of Leicester, Dudley left England in 1605. Arriving in Florence, Dudley entered the service of the Cosimo II, Grand Duke of Tuscany, as an engineer and naval commander. In 1646, Dudley published "Arcano del mare", the whole written in Italian by Dudley himself. The atlas was twelve years in the making, and the main innovation lay in its conception of a world atlas of charts, both general ocean charts and detailed surveys, covering all the rival spheres of European dominion: Spanish, English and Dutch. Dudley's sources included the original charts of Henry Hudson, and for the Pacific coast he used the observations of Henry Cavendish, the third circumnavigator of the globe and Dudley's brother-in-law. Bookseller Inventory # 72map20

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DUDLEY, Sir Robert (1574-1649).

Published by Florence: 1646 (1646)

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Item Description: Florence: 1646, 1646. 2 sheets joined (23 x 17 ½ inches, trimmed margins showing the platemark). Fine engraved map showing Japan with ornate cartouche and compass rose (very light toning, some separation along the fold). Robert Dudley's splendid Arcano del mare (Secrets of the Sea) is one of the greatest and most complex atlases of the world ever produced. Dudley's monumental work was the only exception to the total dominance of sea-atlas production by the Dutch for nearly a century. The complete work contained nearly 150 sea charts as well as dozens of illustrations and working diagrams. It was superior to any previous work in that the charts illustrated the whole world, and the first time any outside of Europe had been included. Arcano del mare was also the first atlas to show the prevailing winds, currents and magnetic deviation. In using the projection developed by Mercator, Dudley improved upon the theory of navigating by the "Great Circle," the shortest distance between two points on a globe. It was not until the eighteenth century that cartographers used the projection consistently, and during the prolonged period when the Dutch dominated cartographic production, not one atlas was produced using it. One of the great marine atlases of all time, this magnificently engraved work is an encyclopedia of seventeenth-century knowledge regarding the seas. Dudley was one of the more colorful and adventurous characters in the history of mapmaking. The illegitimate son of the Earl of Leicester and Lady Douglas Sheffield, but unable to establish his claim to the title of Earl of Leicester, Dudley left England in 1605. Arriving in Florence, Dudley entered the service of the Cosimo II, Grand Duke of Tuscany, as an engineer and naval commander. In 1646, Dudley published Arcano del mare, the whole written in Italian by Dudley himself. The atlas was twelve years in the making, and the main innovation lay in its conception of a world atlas of charts, both general ocean charts and detailed surveys, covering all the rival spheres of European dominion: Spanish, English and Dutch. Dudley's sources included the original charts of Henry Hudson, and for the Pacific coast he used the observations of Henry Cavendish, the third circumnavigator of the globe (and Dudley's brother-in-law). Aesthetically, the distinctive character of Dudley's charts was due to the Italian Baroque engraving, executed by Antonio Francesco Lucini. For more information about this map, or a warm welcome to see it and other books in our library at 72nd Street, NYC, please contact Tara Mishkovsky, M.A. in the Rare Book Department. Bookseller Inventory # 72TM021

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DUDLEY, Robert

Published by Giuseppe Cocchini,, Florence, (1661)

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Item Description: Giuseppe Cocchini,, Florence, 1661. Dudley's rare chart of the Chinese coast from Taiwan to Japan Engraved map. Map showing the coastlines of China, Taiwan and Japan bordering the East China Sea.From the 'Arcano del Mare', one the "greatest atlases of the world" (Wardington). First published in 1646 when its author, Robert Dudley, was 73, it was not only the first sea atlas of the world, but also the first to use Mercator's projection; the earliest to show magnetic deviation; the first to show currents and prevailing winds; the first to expound the advantages of 'Great Circle Sailing' - the shortest distance between two points on a globe; and "perhaps less importantly the first sea-atlas to be compiled by an Englishman, albeit abroad in Italy" (Wardington).Robert Dudley (1573-1649) was the son of the Earl of Leicester (the one time favourite of Elizabeth I) and Lady Douglas Sheffield, the widow of Lord Sheffield. Although born out of wedlock, Robert received the education and privileges of a Tudor nobleman. He seems to have been interested in naval matters from an early age, and in 1594, at the age of 21, he led an expedition to the Orinoco River and Guiana. His success upon the high-seas was not matched, unfortunately, by his luck at court, and at the beginning of the seventeenth century he was forced to flee, along with his cousin Elizabeth Southwell, to Europe. Eventually he ended up in Florence at the court of Grand Duke Ferdinand I of Tuscany, where he not only married his cousin and converted to Catholicism, but also help Ferdinand wage war against the Mediterranean pirates. In his spare time he set about his great life's work: the 'Arcano del Mare'.For the beautifully engraved charts, Dudley employed the services of Antonio Francesco Lucini. Lucini states in the atlases that the work took him 12 years to complete and required 5,000lbs of copper. The charts are by English and other pilots, and it is generally accepted that the work was both scientific and accurate for the time. It is assumed that Dudley used the original charts of Henry Hudson, and for the Pacific Coast of America used his brother in-law Thomas Cavendish's observations. 480 by 765mm. (19 by 30 inches). Phillips, Atlases 457, 458 and 3428; cf. Shirley, BL, M.DUD-1a-1e. Bookseller Inventory # 11918

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DUDLEY, Robert (1573-1649).

Published by [Florence, 1648, or later]. (1648)

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Item Description: [Florence, 1648, or later]., 1648. Two sheets joined (19 2/8 x 29 4/8 inches to the neat line, full margins showing the plate mark), matted. Fine engraved map showing the coasts of the south-eastern part of the Arabian peninsula, north of Dhofar, the first including the southern part of the Red Sea, the second extending round to India, just north of Goa, with fine cursive lettering, the title in an elaborate cartouche of a shell, decorated with a compass rose and two-masted ship. Exceptionally fine engraved map from "Dell'arcano del mare", THE FIRST ENGLISH NAUTICAL ATLAS AND THE FIRST MARITIME ATLAS TO USE THE MERCATOR PROJECTION. Robert Dudley's "Secrets of the Sea" is "ONE OF THE GREATEST ATLASES OF THE WORLD and one of the most complex ever produced: it is the first sea-atlas of the whole world; the first with all the charts constructed using Mercator's new projection, as corrected by Edward Wright; the first to give magnetic declination; the first to give prevailing winds and currents. the first to expound the advantages of "Great Circle Sailing"; and . the first sea-atlas to be compiled by an Englishman." (Lord Wardington). Dudley's monumental work was the only exception to the total dominance of sea-atlas production by the Dutch for nearly a century. The complete work contained nearly 150 sea charts as well as dozens of illustrations and working diagrams. It was superior to any previous work in that the charts illustrated the whole world, the first time any outside of Europe had been included. His atlas was also the first to importantly show the prevailing winds, currents and magnetic deviation. In using the projection developed by Mercator, Dudley improved upon the theory of navigating by the "Great Circle," the shortest distance between two points on a globe. It was not until the eighteenth century that cartographers used the projection consistently, and during the prolonged period when the Dutch dominated cartographic production, not one atlas was published using it. This magnificently engraved work is an encyclopedia of seventeenth-century knowledge regarding the seas. Dudley was one of the more colorful and adventurous characters in the history of mapmaking. The illegitimate son of the Earl of Leicester and Lady Douglas Sheffield, but unable to establish his claim to the title of Earl of Leicester, Dudley left England in 1605. Arriving in Florence, Dudley entered the service of the Cosimo II, Grand Duke of Tuscany, as an engineer and naval commander. In 1646, Dudley published "Arcano del mare", the whole written in Italian by Dudley himself. The atlas was twelve years in the making, and the main innovation lay in its conception of a world atlas of charts, both general ocean charts and detailed surveys, covering all the rival spheres of European dominion: Spanish, English and Dutch. Dudley's sources included the original charts of Henry Hudson, and for the Pacific coast he used the observations of Henry Cavendish, the third circumnavigator of the globe and Dudley's brother-in-law. Bookseller Inventory # 72map21

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DUDLEY, Robert (1573-1649).

Published by [Florence, 1648, or later]. (1648)

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Item Description: [Florence, 1648, or later]., 1648. Two sheets joined (19 2/8 x 29 4/8 inches to the neat line, full margins showing the plate mark), matted. Fine engraved map showing the coasts of the south-eastern part of the Arabian peninsula, north of Dhofar, the first including the southern part of the Red Sea, the second extending round to India, just north of Goa, with fine cursive lettering, the title in an elaborate cartouche of a shell, decorated with a compass rose and two-masted ship. Exceptionally fine engraved map from "Dell'arcano del mare", THE FIRST ENGLISH NAUTICAL ATLAS AND THE FIRST MARITIME ATLAS TO USE THE MERCATOR PROJECTION. Robert Dudley's "Secrets of the Sea" is "ONE OF THE GREATEST ATLASES OF THE WORLD and one of the most complex ever produced: it is the first sea-atlas of the whole world; the first with all the charts constructed using Mercator's new projection, as corrected by Edward Wright; the first to give magnetic declination; the first to give prevailing winds and currents. the first to expound the advantages of "Great Circle Sailing"; and . the first sea-atlas to be compiled by an Englishman." (Lord Wardington). Dudley's monumental work was the only exception to the total dominance of sea-atlas production by the Dutch for nearly a century. The complete work contained nearly 150 sea charts as well as dozens of illustrations and working diagrams. It was superior to any previous work in that the charts illustrated the whole world, the first time any outside of Europe had been included. His atlas was also the first to importantly show the prevailing winds, currents and magnetic deviation. In using the projection developed by Mercator, Dudley improved upon the theory of navigating by the "Great Circle," the shortest distance between two points on a globe. It was not until the eighteenth century that cartographers used the projection consistently, and during the prolonged period when the Dutch dominated cartographic production, not one atlas was published using it. This magnificently engraved work is an encyclopedia of seventeenth-century knowledge regarding the seas. Dudley was one of the more colorful and adventurous characters in the history of mapmaking. The illegitimate son of the Earl of Leicester and Lady Douglas Sheffield, but unable to establish his claim to the title of Earl of Leicester, Dudley left England in 1605. Arriving in Florence, Dudley entered the service of the Cosimo II, Grand Duke of Tuscany, as an engineer and naval commander. In 1646, Dudley published "Arcano del mare", the whole written in Italian by Dudley himself. The atlas was twelve years in the making, and the main innovation lay in its conception of a world atlas of charts, both general ocean charts and detailed surveys, covering all the rival spheres of European dominion: Spanish, English and Dutch. Dudley's sources included the original charts of Henry Hudson, and for the Pacific coast he used the observations of Henry Cavendish, the third circumnavigator of the globe and Dudley's brother-in-law. Bookseller Inventory # 72map22

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ALLEN, William Shepherd, M.P. (1831-1915). WATKINS, Carleton Eugene (1829-1916) - SAVAGE, Charles R. (1832-1909) - BAGLEY, J.M. (fl.1880s) - JACKSON, William Henry (1843-1942) - KNOWLTON, W. (fl.1880s) - POLLOCK, Charles (fl.1880s), Photographers.

Published by Ca 1880. (1880)

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Item Description: Ca 1880., 1880. Folio (16 4/8 x 12 inches). 66 albumen prints (4 x 6 inches; 7 4/8 x 4 6/8 inches; 12 x 8 inches; 10 x 13 inches), mounted on 19 heavier stock, the majority with manuscript captions on the mounts, some titled in the image with photographer's credits of C.R. Savage, J.M. Bagley, W.H. Jackson, W. Knowlton and Charles Pollock (mounts spotted, sometimes heavily, throughout). Original maroon blind-panelled morocco (extremities a bit scuffed, top corner of front free endpaper excised, a few leaves excised at the end). Provenance: with the ownership inscriptions of William Shepherd Allen (1831 - 1915), of Woodhead Hall, Cheadle, Staffordshire, England and "Allendale", Piako, Matamata, New Zealand, on the front paste-down. Including original photographs of San Franciso: the interior and exterior of the Palace Hotel, Montgomery Street; cable car crossing at Geary and Larkin streets; a view from the Residence, Senator Stanford; Market Street; China Town; California Street; Calaveras Grove; Residence of Charles Crocker (1822 - 1888), Southern Pacific Railroad executive; Mrs [Mary] Mark Hopkins residence, wife of the bookkeeper for the Central Pacific Railroad; Seal Point; The Golden Gate from Telegraph Hill; Arch Rock near St. Pinos Light House, Monterey California; the Mills residence in Milbrae [sic]. Also original photographs of views of the Nevada Fall Yosemite; Mount Hood from Portland, Oregon; Cathedral Rocks; Elcapitan; from the Mariposa Road; Agassiz Rock from Union Point; the Home Insurance Buildings in Chicago; Niagara Falls; Trinity Church, Brooklyn Bridge, Broadway, the Navaro [sic] Apartment House (also known as the Spanish Flats) New York; the Statue of Liberty; the entrance to New York; the Hudson River (?from Westpoint). There are also numerous souvenir photographs in and around Salt Lake City; the railroad through the Rocky Mountains; Colorado; Chicago; and New York. Allen was born in Manchester, and was actively involved in English politics as a Member of Parliament for Newcastle-under-Lyme from 1866 until he finally settled in New Zealand, in 1895. He had bought the first part of his Annandale estate in 1885 while visiting New Zealand, and the house, built in 1892, and the enlarged property provided for his sons, one of whom was Colonel Sir Stephen Shepherd Allen, in New Zealand. Allen later became involved in New Zealand politics at both the local and national level. It is possible that this photograph album records part of a return journey from New Zealand to England in the late 1880s. Bookseller Inventory # 72photo2

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BENNETT, William J. - after William TODD

Published by Henry I. Megarey, New York (1842)

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Item Description: Henry I. Megarey, New York, 1842. Color printed aquatint with hand-coloring. Rare color aquatint view of Mobile, Alabama, at the height of the cotton trade. This large scale view of Mobile, Alabama, captures the hub of the city's prosperity in the 1840's. Based on a watercolor done in 1841, the view shows a vast array of clipper ships and one steamboat in the harbor. Mobile was at this time the primary port for the exportation of the cotton grown in the rich black soil of upstate Alabama and Mississippi. "The wharves along the riverfront swarmed with boats from upriver piled high with cotton bales. In the lower bay, fleets of oceangoing ships waited for cargoes to be brought down on them on lighters . The drawing by William Todd, on which William James Bennett based his aquatint, glorifies the city as a thriving seaport. Large, oceangoing vessels with billowing sails, drawn against a vast expanse of southern sky, dwarf the dwellings, the public buildings and the warehouses that crown the quays. A veritable forest of masts interposes itself between the viewer and the shore" (Deak). William James Bennett (c. 1787-1844) was born in England and received his training at the Royal Academy. He emigrated to the United States in 1826, and is best known for his views of American cities, including the Hudson Valley Region, Niagara Falls, and numerous port cities such as New York, Charleston, and Buffalo. With the arrival of William Bennett and several other émigré artists such as William Guy Wall, and John Hill, the quality of aquatint engraving in America was elevated to a level equaling, or perhaps even surpassing, that of European printmakers. This print was published at the beginning of an important period in the history of American topographical-view making. Deak 515. Bookseller Inventory # 32394

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Item Description: [Boston? ca. 1758]., 1758. Ink and watercolor manuscript map, drawn on two sheets each 10 3/4 x 29 3/4 inches. Sheets disjoined, light staining from glue remnants at inner edges of both sheets. Some dust soiling around edges and in rightmost map quadrant, a few patches of dark dampstaining in and around title area. Minor chips around edges, 2 3/4 inch tear in blank right margin. Light tanning. Good plus. Manuscript coastal survey with watercolor accents of the route of Captain Henry Atkins on his third voyage to Labrador in 1758, charting his course along the eastern coast of Labrador from the Strait of Belle Isle north to Davis Inlet and beyond. The chart marks the track of Atkins route, gives depth soundings approximately every mile, and identifies many of the islands fringing the coast and the bays and inlets along the coast. The title is set in the upper left corner, with scale below, an additional small cartouche to the right noting that a J. Leach made this copy from the original chart drawn up by Atkins, and a large compass rose on each sheet. Henry Atkins made three trips to Labrador in 1729, 1753, and 1758, where he was one of the first whalers to hunt sperm whales so far north on the North American coast, identified several viable fishing areas, and established trade with local Inuits. When he returned nearly thirty years later, he stopped in Boston to attract sponsors, one of whom was the Governor Francis Bernard, in whose papers the original account of the Atkins voyage resides. A unique document of important early exploration of Labrador and the northeastern Canadian coast. Bookseller Inventory # WRCAM 52155

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CARE Henry

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Item Description: 1682. First Edition. "(CARE, Henry). English Liberties: Or, The Free-Born Subject's Inheritance. Containing I. Magna Charta, The Petition of Right, the Habeas Corpus Act II. The Proceedings in Appeals of Murther; The Work and Power of Parliaments As also the Oath and Duty of Grant and Petty Juries. III. All the Laws against Conventicles and Protestant Differeters And an Abstract of all the Laws against Papists. London: Printed by G. Larkin, for Benjamin Harris, [1682]. Small octavo (3-1/2 by 6 inches), contemporary full polished brown sheep rebacked with original spine laid down, later red morocco spine label. Housed in a custom clamshell box. $16,000.Rare first edition, containing printings of the Magna Charta and other seminal documents on the separation of church and state, the right to religious liberty, trial by jury and other founding principles. It was designed to "slip into one's pocket [and] had more to do with preparing the minds of American colonists for the American Revolution than the larger but less accessible works of Coke, Sidney and Locke" (Hudson, 580-85). Care's influence is clear "in the writings of the founding fathers of the United States—Samuel Adams, John Adams, John Dickinson and Alexander Hamilton Jefferson added two copies of English Liberties to his library and arranged that it be included in the library of the University of Virginia" (Schwoerer, 231-5). A handsome copy in contemporary sheep. Care's English Liberties contains "the most important documents and statements in English history and law concerning liberty, property and the rights of the individual Benjamin Franklin knew its contents thoroughly" (Lemay, Life, 74). This first edition features a printing of the Magna Charta, "a symbol of political liberty and the foundation of constitutional government" (Grams, Great Experiment, 95), and was published in 1682 "to provide uneducated and inexperienced English persons with documents and information about the law and their rights praising England's 'fundamental laws [as] coeval with government' and describing the Magna Charta as 'Declaratory of the principal grounds of the Fundamental Laws and Liberties of England.' Celebrating law in another piece as second only to the gospel, he described it in English Liberties as 'the Best Birthright the Subject hath' Care regarded the essence of this birthright as the 'privilege not to be exempt from the law of the land, but to be freed in Person and Estate from Arbitrary Violence and Oppression'" (Morrison & Zook, Revolutionary Currents, 46-7). "Care advocated a radical theory of liberty of the religious conscience for all persons and argued for the principle of separation of church and state his ideas are comparable to those of John Locke on that subject and were in print before Locke's Letter on Toleration." Care especially promoted "an abiding respect for the merits of trial by jury as a bulwark of English rights and liberties. English Liberties helped to transmit this 'jury ideology' and other ideas about fundamental laws and the rights and liberties of Englishmen to 18th-century England and the American colonies" (Schwoerer, Ingenious Mr. Henry Care, xxvi). On publication, English Liberties "became a publishing phenomenon, with successive editions circulating around the Atlantic world in the 18th century, its small size—it could literally fit into a pocket—enabling knowledge of English rights to reach the peripheries of the empire" (Yirush, Settler, Liberty and Empire, 29). It is said to have "had more to do with preparing the minds of American colonists for the American Revolution than the larger but less accessible works of Coke, Sidney and Locke" (Hudson, William Penn's English Liberties, 585).In America, English Liberties "played an important role in spreading concepts about English law, history, government, liberties and especially juries Colonists found in Care's English Liberties support of their views about the Saxons' Magna Charta as a reaffirmation of. Bookseller Inventory # 107887

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CHAMPLAIN SOCIETY.

Published by Toronto: 1907-2012. (2012)

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Item Description: Toronto: 1907-2012., 2012. Hardcover. Book Condition: Very Good. 115 Volumes, including the main series, the Hudson’s Bay Record Society series (12 Vols.), the Ontario series (16 Vols.), and the set of Champlain’s works (7 Vols.). all crested limited editions except for one volume of the Ontario series (Fort. Frontenac). 8vo. original cloth (a few volumes with staining to cloth, some spines faded). A cornerstone series for any serious collection of Canadiana. The set includes important early narratives relating to the exploration, fur trade, and early history and settlement of Canada. Some of these are first editions in English of major French sources, i.e. Samuel de Champlain, Nicolas Denys, Chrestien LeClercq, Pierre de La Verendrye, the Sieur de Dièreville, Gabriel Sagard, and François Du Creux. Other accounts include those of Marc Lescarbot, Samuel Hearne, John Knox, David Thompson, John Maclean, Patrick Campbell, James Colnett, Lord Selkirk, John Palliser, Alexander Henry, and Sir John Franklin. There are numerous volumes of documents relating to the North West and Hudson’s Bay Companies, others on the War of 1812, the 1837 Rebellion in Upper Canada, the diaries and papers of Simeon Perkins, Chief Justice William Smith, and Lord Minto, telegrams of the North-West campaign, &c. Bookseller Inventory # elala173

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MOLL, Herman (1654-1732)

Published by H. Moll, T. & J. Bowles, P. Overton & J. King, London (1730)

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Item Description: H. Moll, T. & J. Bowles, P. Overton & J. King, London, 1730. Copper-engraved map, on four joined sheets, with original outline colour, in excellent condition. A fine copy of Herman Moll's monumental and highly engaging world map, charted on Mercator's Projection This fascinating global perspective depicts the latest state of knowledge of the world in the first quarter of the eighteenth-century. The delineation of Europe, South America, and southern Asia is quite sophisticated, while the depiction of regions further beyond suggests only fleeting exploration or outright speculation. The map features the sailing tracks of various explorers including Henry Hudson, Thomas James, Willem Barents and the circumnavigation of Woodes Rogers. Most of the Arctic is labelled "Parts Unknown," and the American West is largely conjectural, featuring California as an island, the most beloved of cartographic misconceptions. Lands as depicted to the east of the Spice Islands are scarcely contemplated, "Iesso," or Hokkaido, is shown to be part of Siberia, and eastern Australia is left as a complete enigma, decades before the voyages of James Cook. This map was intended to satiate the intense English interest in maritime exploration and commerce. The oceans within the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn feature highly detailed hydrological information, most notably the direction of ocean currents, gleaned from Moll's esteemed contemporary Sir Edmond Halley. The inset to the upper left of the map features a diminutive world map depicting numerous lines of the degrees of compass variation. These calculations are, in part, based on measurements taken by Woodes Rogers during his transit across the Pacific, his individual readings being noted on the general map. An elegant circular inset in the lower left of the map depicts the Arctic regions as seen from directly above the Pole. This magnificent composition is further accentuated by the large title cartouche, which features personifications of the Old and New Worlds, enlivened by the most virtuous engraving. The present map was part of Herman Moll's magnificent folio work, a New and Compleat Atlas . Moll was the most important cartographer working in London during his era, a career that spanned over fifty years. His origins have been a source of great scholarly debate; however, the prevailing opinion suggests that he hailed from the Hanseatic port city of Bremen, Germany. Joining a number of his countrymen, he fled the turmoil of the Scanian Wars for London, and in 1678 is first recorded as working there as an engraver for Moses Pitt on the production of the English Atlas . It was not long before Moll found himself as a charter member of London's most interesting social circle, which congregated at Jonathan's Coffee House at Number 20 Exchange Alley, Cornhill. It was at this establishment that speculators met to trade equities (most notoriously South Sea Company shares). Moll's coffeehouse circle included the scientist Robert Hooke, the archaeologist William Stuckley, the authors Jonathan Swift and Daniel Defoe, and the intellectually-gifted pirates William Dampier, Woodes Rogers and William Hacke. From these friends, Moll gained a great deal of privileged information that was later conveyed in his cartographic works, some appearing in the works of these same figures. Moll was highly astute, both politically and commercially, and he was consistently able to craft maps and atlases that appealed to the particular fancy of wealthy individual patrons, as well as the popular trends of the day. In many cases, his works are amongst the very finest maps of their subjects ever created with toponymy in the English language. Shirley, Maps in the Atlases of the British Library I , T.Moll-4b, 2; Cf. Reinhartz, The Cartographer and the Literati: Herman Moll and his Intellectual Circle. Bookseller Inventory # 17937

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Milbert, Jacques Gerard

Published by Henry Gaugain, Lambert et Cie., Paris (1826)

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Item Description: Henry Gaugain, Lambert et Cie., Paris, 1826. Edition : First edition., rebacked expertly saving the original spine., 1826-28. The first edition of an outstanding series of American views. Milbert spent seven years in the United States, beginning in 1815, under the auspices of the Museum of Natural History in Paris. Milbert brought back to France the sketches from which the present lithographed views were made. It includes fine views of New York City (2), Long Island, Tarrytown, West Point (2), Hudson Falls (2), Albany (2), Saratoga Springs and Niagara (3) taken during Milbert?s travels in America between 1815 and 1822., Size : Folio (500 x 335mm)., Lithographed decorative pictorial title on buff paper, double-paged lithographed hand coloured map by H.Taquet dated 1826, side panels with list of plates. 48 (out of 54) superbly hand coloured lithographed views after Milbert by Deroy, Sabatier, Bichebois, V.Adam, Tirpenne, Joly and Villeneuve, on Indian paper mounted.It lacks the seven following plates (number 41, 44, 45, 48, 49, 51and 54)., Volume : Atlas volume only., References : Howes M592; Sabin 48916; Streeter 2, 910. minor marks on plates 21 and 34, printing flaw across bottom cover of plate 38 (a proof before title), occasional minor spotting in margins only, the images unaffected, Bookseller Inventory # B844

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SCARBOROUGH, James Allen (1805-1852).

Published by [ca 1849]. (1849)

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Item Description: [ca 1849]., 1849. Single sheet (11 4/8 x 19 6/8 inches). Fine manuscript chart of Neah Bay, now part of the Makah Reservation in Washington at the mouth of the Strait of Juan de Fuca near the border with Canada, extending from Point Hilcome in the west to Sail Rock in the east, showing the 'Spanish Village' of Neah, Mena, and Scarborough's Point, Why Had Da island, sandbanks, and soundings, with a large compass rose upper right, comments about tides and a scale (old folds, margins with one or two nicks and tears). A very detailed map of an area first published by Charles Wilkes in his map "St. Juan Harbour, Straits of Fuca, Vancouver Island. Scarborough Harbour, Port Discovery, Straits of Fuca, Oregon Territory", as part of his "Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition. During the years 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842", Philadelphia: Lea and Blanchard, 1845. There are some similarities (ie Point Hilcome), but also distinct differences in the place-names: Wah Had Da island is named by Wilkes as Neah Island, Mena is Village Point, and Scarborough Point is Sail Rock Point. The name "Neah" refers to how the Makah Chief Dee-ah, pronounced Neah in the Klallam language, but other names had been previously used for the bay. In August of 1788 Captain Charles Duncan, a British trader, charted a bay at the same location, but did not give it a name. In 1790 Manuel Quimper took possession of the bay for Spain and named it "Bahía de Núñez Gaona" in honor of Alonso Núñez de Haro y Peralta, viceroy of New Spain. In 1792 Salvador Fidalgo began to build a Spanish fort on Neah Bay, during which time George Vancouver charted but did not stop at the bay. American traders called Neah Bay "Poverty Cove". In 1841 the United States Exploring Expedition under Charles Wilkes mapped the region and named Neah Bay "Scarborough Harbour" in honor of Captain Scarborough of the Hudson's Bay Company, who created this map, and who assisted Wilkes' expedition. The Wilkes map contained the first use of the word "Neah", but only for the bay's island. The bay was first called Neah in 1847 by Captain Henry Kellett during his reorganization of the British Admiralty charts. Kellett spelled it "Neeah Bay". "Neah Harbour is but a small indentation in the coast, which is partly sheltered on the northeast by Neah Island. It is the position where the Spaniards attempted to establish themselves in 1792, and which they called Port Nunez Gaona. The remains of an old fort are still to be perceived, and some bricks were found that were supposed to have belonged to it . Water is to be obtained here in some quantity, and a small vessel would have no difficulty in getting enough. It offers a tolerably safe anchorage, though somewhat exposed to the northwest gales; yet by anchoring well in, which a small vessel may do, protection even from these gales might be had. (Wilkes, volume IV, page 483) The Cadboro was built and owned by the Hudson's Bay Company, in Rye, Sussex, in 1824, with one deck and two masts, she was schooner-rigged, with a standing bowsprit. She "sailed from London on her first trip in the fall of 1826, rounding Cape Horn, and arriving at Fort Vancouver, Oregon Territory, in the spring of the following year, bringing, beside her crew of picked men, several new servants for the Hudson's Bay Company.The Cadboro was the crack vessel of the Pacific Coast. She carried six guns, thirty-five men, and made a barrel of money for the Hudson's Bay Company on her trading trips between Nootka Sound and Fort Vancouver. Capt. James Scarborough succeeded Captain Brotchie and continued sailing her for ten years, when in 1848 he gave way to James Sangster. though she did good service until the gold rush in 1858, she was beginning to show age, so in 1860 the company sold her at auction to Captain Howard for $2,450. Her new owner operated her as a coal and lumber vessel between Victoria and neighboring ports until October, 1862, when during a trip up the Sound with a cargo of lumber she was caugh. Bookseller Inventory # 72map294

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WALL, William G. (1792-1864)

Published by New York: Henry I. Megaray, 1820-1828 (1828)

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Item Description: New York: Henry I. Megaray, 1820-1828, 1828. BREATHTAKING EARLY VIEW OF PALISADES Engraved by John Hill (1812-1879). 18 x 12 inches visible, 26 ½ x 33 inches framed, aquatint engraving with original hand color. Plate legend on bottom margin bearing title, portfolio name and number, and publisher name (discoloration along the margins, toning consistent with age). This breathtaking engraving of the Palisades comes from the popular Hudson River Portfolio, a collaboration between Irish watercolorist William Guy Wall, engraver John Hill, and publisher Henry Magary. This portfolio provided some of the earliest artistic representations of the Hudson River. This present work shows a view of the majestic Palisades rising up on the New Jersey side of the Hudson River from the vantage point of the river, with sailboats and a northbound steamship passing along a ribbon of water, in the shadow of the giant natural formation. The Palisades are a row of steep cliffs along the West side of the lower Hudson River in Northeastern New Jersey and Southern New York, and are among the most sublime geological sights around New York City. The cliffs ascent nearly vertically from around the edge of the river, rising to about 300 feet high at Weehawken, and slowly increasing to 540 feet near their Northern end. They stretch for about 20 miles, north from Jersey City to around Nyack, New York. In the 19th century, the cliffs were often quarried for railroad material, leading to a series of long-term efforts to preserve the natural formation. In the 1910s, the Palisades were often used as a film location, most notably serving as the setting for the serial The Perils of Pauline, which contributed to the popularization of the term cliff hanger. In June 1983, the National Park Service designated the Palisades a "National Natural Landmark." Today it is a beloved destination for hiking and other recreational outdoor activities. Catalogued by Xueli Wang, Columbia University, BA; Courtauld Institute of Art, MA. You are warmly invited to visit our gallery at 1016 Madison Avenue in New York City to view this work whenever it might be convenient. It is my intention to have highly competitive prices. Your thoughts are welcome. Bookseller Inventory # 1016XW20

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