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Introducing INK LDN: London’s latest book fair


Two Temple Place, venue for INK LDN

There’s a new book fair in town… or least in London. INK LDN is a brand new international antiquarian book and art fair that takes place on October 21 and 22 at 2 Temple Place on the Embankment.

The brainchild of London-based antiquarian booksellers Ines Bellin and Leo Cadogan, and sponsored by AbeBooks.co.uk, INK LDN brings together dealers offering rare books, art, photography and manuscripts.

The Fair will focus on exhibitors offering exclusive items. “We don’t want dealers with 12 first editions of Ulysses,” said Ines Bellin. “We are emphasizing quality over quantity. INK LDN will be a sophisticated, elegant book fair.”

The venue is a magnificent building built by newspaper and property magnate William Waldorf Astor that still boasts beautiful artwork, and opulent décor. It’s where Downton Abbey filmed the marriage of Lady Rose and Atticus Aldrige.

You will find 2 Temple Place at London, WC2R 3BD. Admission is £10. The opening hours are Friday 21st October, 11am-7pm, and Saturday 22nd October, 11am-3pm. The nearest Tube station is Temple on the District and Circle lines.

Numerous sellers who use the AbeBooks marketplace will be present at INK LDN, including Peter Harrington, Bernard Quaritch, Maggs Bros, Shapero Rare Books, Sophia Rare Books from Denmark, and Libreria Alberto Govi di Fabrizio Govi from Italy.

INK LDN is staging a charity dinner is in aid of the London Library on 19 October at 7pm, at The Crypt at St Etheldreda’s, 14 Ely Place, London EC1N 8SJ.  There is also a champagne reception and preview on 20 October starting at 5pm at 2 Temple Place.

Visit the INK LDN website for more information and tickets.

One of the booksellers who will be attending INK LDN is Abby Schoolman from New York, who specializes in art bookbindings and artist’s books. Abby was kind enough to answer some questions about her line of work.

Bookseller Abby Schoolman

AbeBooks: Tell us about your business?

Abby Schoolman: “There are five incredibly talented artists with whom I work with exclusively. Whatever they make, I sell. I also include in my inventory a number of specially selected books by other talented bookbinders and book artists.”

AbeBooks: How did you get started in the bookselling business?

Abby Schoolman: “I was trained as an archivist and rare book librarian. In early 2000, while working for a historical society in New York, I was recruited by Bauman Rare Books to work in its then brand new Madison Avenue gallery. I jumped at the chance. For over 14 years, I worked with five centuries of the most interesting and beautiful books in almost every field of human thought. It was heaven.

“A few days before I started working for Bauman, I stumbled across an exhibit of contemporary bindings of books on angling at the American Museum of Natural History. For the first time in my life, I bought an exhibition catalog. Little did I know that, many years later, buying exhibition catalogs of contemporary bookbinding exhibits from the mid-20th century to the present would become my obsession.

“One thing I had often discussed was the lack of information available on the great contemporary binders of the Americas. Who were they and where? My French is terrible and I don’t speak Spanish or Portuguese. The Internet is pretty useless where art bookbinding is concerned. I started haunting The Strand‘s ‘on Books’ aisle and the Oak Knoll website for books and catalogs about modern binding. With those first few gems I picked up at The Strand, I started a blog, American Bound. It was just for fun. I had no idea where it would lead. I studied the work of and met so many wonderful bookbinders and book artists while writing my blog. A year later, I decided to go out on my own, do consulting work in the trade, and try to figure out how to create my dream job: selling art bookbindings and artist’s books made by living artists.

“Almost immediately, the strangest thing happened. A binding I had posted as part of one of my (then) weekly blog entries was purchased by a dealer. He is someone I know well. He sent me an email asking for the contact information for the binder. I didn’t know her personally, but her contact information was in the exhibition catalog in which I had seen the binding. I passed it along. The binder, Malina Belcheva of Chicago, sold the book (which is now in the book arts collection of the Boston Athenaeum) and asked me to be her agent. I quickly asked three of my favorite art binders if they would work with me. They all said yes. I was amazed that Christine Giard (France), Sonya Sheats (USA), and Mark Cockram (UK) would want to work with someone just starting out in their field. I started my business with all the bindings these four artists could send me.

“Less than a year later I took on a few books from Timothy C. Ely. He had worked with many great book arts booksellers such as Ursus Books, Granary Books, and the late Toni Zwicker, and many art galleries. Ely, in my opinion, is one of the greatest living book artists. For just over a year, I have had the great honor of being Ely’s sole bookseller. I recently published a book on eight of his most recently completed works. It’s called Timothy C. Ely: 8 Books. I call it a book, but really it is a bookseller’s catalog that got way, way out of hand: 58 pages on just eight books.”

One of Abby’s Timothy C. Ely books, called Gamma Cruxis

AbeBooks: You work closely with artists – what is that process like?

Abby Schoolman: “Mostly, I stay out of their way. I want them to make whatever they want, in whatever format or medium they choose, regardless of what they have made or sold in the past. The freedom to choose, and the freedom from the constraints of set book competitions, juried exhibitions, and traditional expectations allows the artists breathing space. The result is better art.

“My role as agent and bookseller for my five principal artists varies greatly based on individual needs or projects. Sometimes I am a sounding board for ideas, sometimes a safe space for venting frustration, sometimes I am a student learning about structure or technique or obscure bookbinder lore, sometimes I gently give deadlines by providing a list of dates of upcoming book and art fairs. For some I write or edit documents. I also try to hustle on the behalf of those artists who wish to line up lectures, workshops, or other gigs. Often I listen to their ideas for bookselling; some of my artists have been in the book business for far longer than I, though from a different angle.”

AbeBooks: What is the most prized item in your inventory?

Abby Schoolman: “Timothy Ely’s unique manuscript and binding Bones of the Book: An Oblong Identity is a masterpiece. There is simply no other way to look at it. It’s huge (44.5cm x 30cm x 3.5cm), very personal and, even for Ely, incredibly complex in scope. It is special in many ways, not least because it took him 25 years to complete. The title page says 1990 and it was exhibited. He didn’t sell it. Sometimes he showed it, but the truth is that it just didn’t feel finished to him. In 2015, he removed the original binding (now in the Ely archives), worked more on the original pages, added pages, and rebound the book. It is now truly complete, spectacular, and will be at INK LDN.

Bones of a Book by Timothy C. Ely

“Bones of the Book is the second in a three-book series that differs significantly from Ely’s other art. These books are both biographical and autobiographical. Each honors the important influence of family members in Ely’s life, and combines it with an aspect of bookbinding—the format Ely has chosen to house his artwork throughout his career. In each case, there is also a third narrative that plays a significant role in Ely’s identity as an individual and as an artist.

“The series began with Binding the Book: The Flight Into Egypt in 1985. Egypt is about Ely’s grandfather, the journal he left behind about his mysterious trip to Egypt between the wars, bookbinding, and the geography of Egypt. For much more information, see The Flight into Egypt: Binding the Book. It’s out-of-print, but there are often copies available on AbeBooks.”

AbeBooks: Why do you support and participate in bookfairs?

Abby Schoolman: “I love book fairs. When I worked for Bauman Rare Books, I loved to select the books, travel to the fair venue, set up the showcases, and walk around gaping at all the books. It’s glorious to see the best, the most interesting, their weirdest, the most beautiful books and ephemera from all over the world just lined up for you to look at and hold. There’s a buzz and enthusiasm among the dealers who have carefully selected the sexiest items in their inventory. It’s not at all the same as visiting a bookshop.”

AbeBooks: What’s your favourite book?

Abby Schoolman: “I can answer that a number of different ways, but I’ll stick with the book arts: I have an unreasonable obsession with Paul Nash’s Genesis.”

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