The Stones of Venice Edited and Abridged By J.G. Links

Ruskin, John

Published by Collins, 1960
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254 pp. 5 monochrome plates. 23 monochrome in-text figures. Index. An edited and abridged version of the 1853 first edition with an introduction by the editor. Internally clean and sound although paper has sl. age toned. Previous owner title in ink on ffep. Black cloth covered boards with stamped titles printed in copper foil on backstrip. Monochrome illustrated dustjacket is soiled and worn along edges and rubbed along spine. Now protected by plastic book wrap. Size: 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall. Bookseller Inventory #

Bibliographic Details

Title: The Stones of Venice Edited and Abridged By ...
Publisher: Collins
Publication Date: 1960
Binding: Cloth
Book Condition: Very Good
Edition: First Edition

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Ruskin, John:
Published by London: Penguin, 2001 (2001)
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Book Description London: Penguin, 2001, 2001. 8vo Pict. Card Covers Rpt. Illus.254 pp. V.g. Bookseller Inventory # 35437

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Ruskin, John.
Published by London, Penguin Books Ltd. (2001)
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Book Description London, Penguin Books Ltd., 2001. Classic Penguin History, First Edition. 13 cm x 20 cm. 254 pages, 6 plates. Original Hardcover with illustrated dustjacket in protective Mylar. Private inscription on title and contents pages, otherwise in very good condition with only minor signs of external wear. The Stones of Venice is a treatise on Venetian art and architecture by English art historian John Ruskin, first published from 1851 to 1853. The Stones of Venice examines Venetian architecture in detail, describing for example over eighty churches. He discusses architecture of Venice's Byzantine, Gothic and Renaissance periods, and provides a general history of the city. As well as being an art historian, Ruskin was a social reformer. In the chapter "The Nature of Gothic", Ruskin gives his views on how society should be organised: 'We want one man to be always thinking, and another to be always working, and we call one a gentleman, and the other an operative; whereas the workman ought often to be thinking, and the thinker often to be working, and both should be gentlemen, in the best sense. As it is, we make both ungentle, the one envying, the other despising, his brother; and the mass of society is made up of morbid thinkers and miserable workers. Now it is only by labour that thought can be made healthy, and only by thought that labour can be made happy, and the two cannot be separated with impunity.' (Wikipedia) John Ruskin (8 February 1819 20 January 1900) was the leading English art critic of the Victorian era, as well as an art patron, draughtsman, watercolourist, a prominent social thinker and philanthropist. He wrote on subjects as varied as geology, architecture, myth, ornithology, literature, education, botany and political economy. His writing styles and literary forms were equally varied. Ruskin also penned essays and treatises, poetry and lectures, travel guides and manuals, letters and even a fairy tale. The elaborate style that characterised his earliest writing on art was later superseded by a preference for plainer language designed to communicate his ideas more effectively. In all of his writing, he emphasised the connections between nature, art and society. He also made detailed sketches and paintings of rocks, plants, birds, landscapes, and architectural structures and ornamentation. He was hugely influential in the latter half of the 19th century, and up to the First World War. After a period of relative decline, his reputation has steadily improved since the 1960s with the publication of numerous academic studies of his work. Today, his ideas and concerns are widely recognised as having anticipated interest in environmentalism, sustainability and craft. Ruskin first came to widespread attention with the first volume of Modern Painters (1843), an extended essay in defence of the work of J. M. W. Turner in which he argued that the principal role of the artist is "truth to nature". From the 1850s he championed the Pre-Raphaelites who were influenced by his ideas. His work increasingly focused on social and political issues. Unto This Last (1860, 1862) marked the shift in emphasis. In 1869, Ruskin became the first Slade Professor of Fine Art at the University of Oxford, where he established the Ruskin School of Drawing. In 1871, he began his monthly "letters to the workmen and labourers of Great Britain", published under the title Fors Clavigera (18711884). In the course of this complex and deeply personal work, he developed the principles underlying his ideal society. As a result, he founded the Guild of St George, an organisation that endures today. (Wikipedia). Bookseller Inventory # 30094AB

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