Stock Image

Falmouth, Jamaica: Architecture as History

Louis P. Nelson, Edward A. Chappell, Brian Cofrancesco, Emilie Johnson

1 ratings by Goodreads
ISBN 10: 9766404933 / ISBN 13: 9789766404932
Published by University of the West Indies Press
New Condition: new Soft cover
From THE SAINT BOOKSTORE (Southport, United Kingdom)

AbeBooks Seller Since 14 June 2006 Seller Rating 5-star rating

Quantity Available: > 20

Buy New
Price: 46.16 Convert Currency
Shipping: 6.94 From United Kingdom to U.S.A. Destination, rates & speeds
Add to basket

About this Item

BRAND NEW, Falmouth, Jamaica: Architecture as History, Louis P. Nelson, Edward A. Chappell, Brian Cofrancesco, Emilie Johnson, Founded in 1769 as a new port town on JamaicaAEs north coast, Falmouth expanded dramatically in the decades around 1800 as it supported the rapidly expanding sugar production of Trelawney and neighboring parishes. Many of the surviving buildings in Falmouth are the townhouses and shops of the planters and merchants who benefitted from the wealth of sugar. That same community also built a major Anglican church and a courthouse, both of which still survive and remain in use. In those same years, the town hosted a growing free-black population and this community also left its mark on the historic town. In 1894, Falmouth received an extraordinary gift from the British crown in the form of the Albert George Market, at once a symbol of persistent colonialism, a shelter for the ancient Sunday markets, and a symbol of modernism in the form of its vast cast iron design. Monuments in the city from the twentieth century include an extraordinary round Catholic church and an impressively Modernist school wing. With little investment through the twentieth century, the town was entirely re-conceptualized in the opening years of the twenty-first century with the construction of a vast cruise ship terminal. Spanning from the foundation of the town in 1769 to the opening of the cruise ship terminal in 2008, this book explores the wide range of architecture built by Jamaicans and others in the making of this extraordinary town. Bookseller Inventory # B9789766404932

Ask Seller a Question

Bibliographic Details

Title: Falmouth, Jamaica: Architecture as History

Publisher: University of the West Indies Press

Binding: Paperback

Book Condition: new

About this title

Synopsis:

Founded in 1769 as a new port town on Jamaica’s north coast, Falmouth expanded dramatically in the decades around 1800 as it supported the rapidly expanding sugar production of Trelawney and neighboring parishes. Many of the surviving buildings in Falmouth are the townhouses and shops of the planters and merchants who benefitted from the wealth of sugar. That same community also built a major Anglican church and a courthouse, both of which still survive and remain in use. In those same years, the town hosted a growing free-black population and this community also left its mark on the historic town. In 1894, Falmouth received an extraordinary gift from the British crown in the form of the Albert George Market, at once a symbol of persistent colonialism, a shelter for the ancient Sunday markets, and a symbol of modernism in the form of its vast cast iron design. Monuments in the city from the twentieth century include an extraordinary round Catholic church and an impressively Modernist school wing. With little investment through the twentieth century, the town was entirely re-conceptualized in the opening years of the twenty-first century with the construction of a vast cruise ship terminal. Spanning from the foundation of the town in 1769 to the opening of the cruise ship terminal in 2008, this book explores the wide range of architecture built by Jamaicans and others in the making of this extraordinary town.

About the Author:

Louis P. Nelson is the Associate Dean for Research and International Programs in the School of Architecture, University of Virginia, USA where he teaches courses in American architecture specializing in colonial and early national architecture, vernacular architecture, and theories and practices of sacred space. The majority of his work focuses on the early American South, the Greater Caribbean, and the Atlantic rim. Nelson is interested in the close examination of evidence-both material and textual-as a means of interrogating the ways architecture shapes the human experience. His commitment to field-based object analysis situates him in the scholarly tradition within American architectural history broadly understood as the study of vernacular architecture.

Edward Chappell is the Shirley and Richard Roberts Director of Architectural and Archaeological Research at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, USA. He is responsible for excavation, architectural scholarship, restoration, historic preservation, and the quality of new architectural design at this, the largest open-air history museum in the US. Chappell has degrees in history from the College of William and Mary and architectural history from the University of Virginia. He has done extensive architectural fieldwork in Bermuda, Jamaica, and the Carolinas as well as the Chesapeake region. He worked as an archaeologist for the Commonwealth of Virginia and as an architectural historian for Kentucky before coming to Colonial Williamsburg in 1980.

Brian Lage Cofrancesco is a Program Coordinator at the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center in Hartford, Connecticut, USA. He has undertaken architectural study and preservation work across the northeast and Caribbean, and his independent research focuses on the eighteenth and nineteenth century architecture of New England and the mid-Atlantic. He holds a Bachelors of Architectural History with minors in architecture and historic preservation from the University of Virginia and is a graduate of the Falmouth Field School in Historic Preservation.

Emilie Johnson is an architectural historian who studies the landscapes and built environments of pre-Emancipation plantations in the American South and British Caribbean. Her work focuses in particular on the architectural sources of buildings, questions of access and circulation through spaces, and multiple meanings in the ways that people occupied plantation structures and environments. She received her PhD in Art and Architectural History from the University of Virginia, and currently works as Assistant Curator at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, the plantation home of America’s third president and a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

"About this title" may belong to another edition of this title.

Store Description

The Saint Bookstore has a range of over 1 million titles available.

Visit Seller's Storefront

Terms of Sale:

Please order through the Abebooks checkout. We only take orders through Abebooks - We don't take direct orders by email or phone.

Refunds or Returns: A full refund of the purchase price will be given if returned within 30 days in undamaged condition.

As a seller on abebooks we adhere to the terms explained at http://www.abebooks.co.uk/docs/HelpCentral/buyerIndex.shtml - if you require further assistance please email us at orders@thesaintbookstore.co.uk

Shipping Terms:

Most orders usually ship within 1-3 business days, but some can take up to 7 days.

List this Seller's Books

Payment Methods
accepted by seller

Visa Mastercard American Express