Stock Image

How To Eat: Pleasures And Principles of Good Food

Nigella Lawson

5,828 ratings by Goodreads
ISBN 10: 0701169117 / ISBN 13: 9780701169114
Published by Chatto and Windus 1999 Paperback, 1999
Condition: Mint
From Book Haven (Wellington, ., New Zealand)

AbeBooks Seller Since 07 April 2005

Quantity Available: 1
Buy Used
Price: £ 31.47 Convert Currency
Shipping: £ 12.89 From New Zealand to U.S.A. Destination, Rates & Speeds
Add to basket

About this Item

'The great British Culinary Renaissance has done many things--given us extra virgin oil, better restaurants and gastroporn--but it hasn't taught us how to cook.'--Nigella Lawson 'How To Eat is a book that does. Firmly rooted in home cooking, part culinary manifesto and part evocation of the pleasures of eating, it has over three hundred and fifty recipes. More than that, it encourages us to see cooking in context and to acquire our own individual sense of what food is about. It covers kitchen basics, fast food, feeding small children, cooking for one and two, weekend lunches, low-fat food and both everyday and more demanding dinners. To counteract the chaos of modern life, it helps us plot menus, and gives kitchen survival strategies and tactical advice on cooking in advance and last-minute eating.At its heart, 'How To Eat is about a feeling for food, a book to be read as well as from which to cook. Unique, invaluable, comprehensive, this is a celebration of good food and an engagingly conversational vade-mecum for the kitchen. Very heavy - extra postage will apply 544 pages. Bookseller Inventory # 1024224

Ask Seller a Question

Bibliographic Details

Title: How To Eat: Pleasures And Principles of Good...

Publisher: Chatto and Windus 1999 Paperback

Publication Date: 1999

Book Condition:Mint

About this title

Synopsis:

"[Nigella] brings you into her life and tells you how she thinks about food, how meals come together in her head . . . and how she cooks for family and friends. . . . A breakthrough . . . with hundreds of appealing and accessible recipes."
–Amanda Hesser, The New York Times

"Nigella Lawson serves up irony and sensuality with her comforting recipes . . . the Queen of Come-On Cooking."
–Los Angeles Times

"A chatty, sometimes cheeky, celebration of home-cooked meals."
–USA Today

"Nigella Lawson is, whisks down, Britain’s funniest and sexiest food writer, a raconteur who is delicious whether detailing every step on the way towards a heavenly roast chicken and root vegetable couscous or explaining why ‘cooking is not just about joining the dots’."
–Richard Story, Vogue magazine

Review:

"Cooking is not about just joining the dots, following one recipe slavishly and then moving on to the next," says British food writer Nigella Lawson. "It's about developing an understanding of food, a sense of assurance in the kitchen, about the simple desire to make yourself something to eat." Lawson is not a chef, but "an eater." She writes as if she's conversing with you while beating eggs or mincing garlic in your kitchen. She explains how to make the basics, such as roast chicken, soup stock, various sauces, cake, and ice cream. She teaches you to cook more esoteric dishes, such as grouse, white truffles (mushrooms, not chocolate), and "ham in Coca-Cola." She gives advice for entertaining over the holidays, quick cooking ("the real way to make life easier for yourself: cooking in advance"), cooking for yourself ("you don't have to belong to the drearily narcissistic learn-to-love-yourself school of thought to grasp that it might be a good thing to consider yourself worth cooking for"), and weekend lunches for six to eight people. Don't expect any concessions to health recommendations in the recipes here--Lawson makes liberal and unapologetic use of egg yolks, cream, and butter. There are plenty of recipes, but the best parts of How to Eat are the well-crafted tidbits of wisdom, such as the following:

  • "Cook in advance and, if the worse comes to the worst, you can ditch it. No one but you will know that it tasted disgusting, or failed to set, or curdled or whatever."

  • On the proper English trifle: "When I say proper I mean proper: lots of sponge, lots of jam, lots of custard and lots of cream. This is not a timid construction ... you don't want to end up with a trifle so upmarket it's inappropriately, posturingly elegant. A degree of vulgarity is requisite."

  • "Too many people cook only when they're giving a dinner party. And it's very hard to go from zero to a hundred miles an hour. How can you learn to feel at ease around food, relaxed about cooking, if every time you go into the kitchen it's to cook at competition level?"

--Joan Price

"About this title" may belong to another edition of this title.

Store Description

A small neighbourhood second-hand book shop for people who want to read books. Besides the books in the shop, our claim to fame is having a catalogued inventory offsite of more than 50,000 books that can be brought in or posted the next day. We are not a rare-and-collectable bookshop, instead having a bit of this, and a bit of that. While everything's catalogued, it's more fun to browse the shelves. So come in and say g'day.

Visit Seller's Storefront

Terms of Sale:

Our book ship from Wellington, New Zealand.

Shipping Terms:

Books will be sent by Economy Air - 10 to 25 days - unless a faster service is requested. Shipping costs are based on books weighing 500 grams or about 1 LB. If your book order is heavy or oversized, we may contact you to let you know extra shipping is required.

List this Seller's Books

Payment Methods
accepted by seller

Visa Mastercard American Express