East India (Contagious Diseases No. 7 1897)

Arthur Godley, Under Secretary of the State for India

Published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, England, 1897
Used Condition: Good Wraps
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An extremely rare and curious British 19th Century government document that provides arguments and testimony, on behalf of two private organizations, against State regulation of immorality, vice, and prostitution (who argue that State regulation would have the opposite effect and would actually serve to sanction such behavior). As stated, "Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed 6 August 1897" out of "LONDON: PRINTED FOR HER MAJESTY'S STATIONERY OFFICE, BY EYRE AND SPOTTISWOODE, PRINTERS TO THE QUEEN'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY." A large, left-folded document measuring 8-1/4" by 13" and containing six pages, including front and rear covers. As subtitled on the front cover, the report is a "RETURN of MEMORIALS addressed to the Secretary of State for India by the British Committee of the Federation for the Abolition of State Regulation of Vice, against the new Cantonment Regulations proposed by the Government of India, and by the British Women's Temperance Association, against any intervention of the State for the Regulation of Immorality." Contents are as follows: British, Continental and General Federation for the Abolition of the State Regulation of Vice; Two letters to the Right Honourable Lord George Hamilton, M.P., Secretary of State for India from Walter S. B. M'Laren, Chairman of the British, Continental and General Federation for the Abolition of the State Regulation of Vice, reading in short part: "We have already respectfully called your Lordship's attention.[to a clause that] will lead to the re-establishment of the system of the Contagious Diseases Acts in India, and that the conditions laid down in that clause by your Lordship, in which you say that in connection with the measures to be adopted 'there must be nothing that can be represented as an encouragement to vice, there must be no provision of women for the use of soldiers by any authority, civil or military, there must be no registration of prostitutes other than that which is or should be enforced for all inhabitants of cantonments, and no granting of licenses to practise prostitution, there must be no compulsory and periodical examination of women,' are conditions which will be practically neglected. We have also already given your Lordship in the same memorial our reasons for holding that, even when so safeguarded, the proposals of your Lordship's Despatch do not present a practical and possible method of permanently reducing venereal disease."; Committee of the Ladies' National Association for the Abolition of the State Regulation of Prostitution "[A] Respectful MEMORIAL [Petition] of 61,437 Women of the United Kingdom" to the Right Honourable Lord George Hamilton, M.P., Secretary of State for India. The cover letter attached to the petition from the Committee of the Ladies' National Association for the Abolition of the State Regulation of Prostitution is reprinted in this report, and reads in full: "We, the undersigned women of Great Britain and Ireland, deem it our duty emphatically to declare our unaltered and unalterable hostility to every form of State regulation of immorality, whether embodied in the system which was known as the Contagious Diseases Act or in any other form, including the slightly modified and more subtle garb of certain Indian cantonment rules which are now or have recently been under discussion. It is to the principle of all such legislation that we object. We are not concerned with its details, for no attempt to modify or render less indecent certain adjuncts of this system can in any way justify or make less harmful the principle which lies at its root. That principle is based on the assumption of the necessity of vice, with the baneful result that a truce is made with vice, and the practice of immorality in its most repulsive form comes to be regarded as a Governmental institution. We, as women, further oppose this system in all its forms because it inevitably becomes in regard to women an engine of the most shameful oppre. Bookseller Inventory # 006006

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Bibliographic Details

Title: East India (Contagious Diseases No. 7 1897)

Publisher: Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, England

Publication Date: 1897

Binding: Wraps

Book Condition:Good

Edition: First Edition

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Bloomsbury Books Brad Confer 5390 Boulder Hwy Suite #358 Las Vegas, NV 89122 702-456-6844 x358 bloomsbury@earthlink.net

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