Stock Image

Birds of the Heart of England

Easterbrook, Trevor

Published by Liverpool University Press
ISBN 10: 1846318858 / ISBN 13: 9781846318856
New / Hardcover / Quantity Available: 1
From Kennys Bookstore (Olney, MD, U.S.A.)
Available From More Booksellers
View all  copies of this book
Add to basket
List Price:
Price: 30.67
Convert Currency
Shipping: 0
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

Save for Later

About the Book

Bibliographic Details


Title: Birds of the Heart of England

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

Binding: Hardcover

Book Condition: New

Description:

2013. 1st Edition. Hardcover. A bird atlas drawing on sixty years of recording in the heart of England Editor(s): Easterbrook, Trevor. Num Pages: 320 pages, 100 colour illustrations. BIC Classification: 1DBKEM; PSVW6. Category: (G) General (US: Trade). Dimension: 256 x 181 x 21. Weight in Grams: 912. . . . . . Books ship from the US and Ireland. Bookseller Inventory # V9781846318856

About this title:

Book ratings provided by GoodReads:
4 avg rating
(1 ratings)

Críticas: This book is well-produced. If you live in the relevant parts of Oxon, Northants or Warwicks, and are interested in birds, then you should certainly buy it. If you are just interested in birds then it's well worth a look - and you may decide that you wish you lived in the Banbury area - if not for its birds, then certainly for the Banbury Ornithological Society. -- Mark Avery This attractive volume provides an object lesson in what can be achieved by the regular and systematic monitoring of all the birds in a particular region. In this case it is the recording area of the Banbury Ornithological Society (BOS), a block of 12 (4x3) 10-km squares surrounding Banbury (which is in Oxfordshire, but the recording area also includes parts of Northamptonshire and Warwickshire). The book draws upon the results of surveys that have been carried out since 1952. The BOS area does not contain any large waterbodies or significantly important habitats but is a typical lowland agricultural area in the middle of England. Thus, most of the information collected relates to the commoner farmland and woodland species, with rather few records of scarce migrants and rarities. The Society initiated a number of survey techniques, which are described in the book. The Annual Breeding Season Survey, started in 1961, is a rolling programme to monitor the changes in population of 26 species that were neither rare nor very common at that time, for example Grasshopper Warbler Locustella naevia and Willow Tit Poecile montana. The Winter Random Square Survey, started in 1975, is designed to collect information on the abundance and distribution of some of the most common species by means of timed counts in randomly collected 1-km squares. This survey has continued in every winter since then. A similar summer survey commenced in 1991.The book contains the results of these surveys,which convincingly demonstrate the decline of many farmland and woodland species in the area. The book contains introductory chapters explaining the survey methods, and describes the terrain of the BOS area and the habitat changes which have occurred in the past 60 years. The systematic list comprises remarkably succinct species accounts (in contrast to some recent county avifaunas!), with excellent use of multi-coloured charts and tables to illustrate population changes and monthly distribution of records, and 1-km distribution maps - often comparing different time periods. Those for the Common Buzzard Buteo buteo, for example, are particularly illuminating: there were very few registrations in the period 1982-91, but the species occupied virtually every square, apart from some in the east of the area, in 2002-11. There is a short chapter summarising the bird population changes over the 60 years of survey work. A brief conclusion sets out the importance of continuing to collect such data, not least to provide information to inform planning decisions on both a small and a large scale, including the proposed high-speed rail line HS2, which may cut through the area. This is one of a series of excellent county publications produced recently by the non-profitmaking Liverpool University Press and is highly recommended for anyone interested in the systematic monitoring of birds in their home area. -- John Clark British Birds This is one of a series of excellent county publications produced recently by the non-profitmaking Liverpool University Press and is highly recommended for anyone interested in the systematic monitoring of birds in their home area. -- John Clark British Birds ...this excellent book displays a justifiable pride in the achievements of a small local bird club, the Banbury Ornithological Society. Ibis, 156 The subtitle of this excellent book displays a justifiable pride in the achievements of a small local bird club, the Banbury Ornithological Society, founded in 1951 as a result of lectures delivered by the late Bruce Campbell. The area covered has Banbury at its centre, and is now bisected from southeast to northwest by the M40. This is the fifth summary of work done there since 1962, of which Easterbrook has been responsible for three, and it has been carefully timed to coincide with the period of the national atlas. The enterprising Liverpool University Press were also responsible for the Birds of the Cotswolds (Main, Pearce & Hutton 2009; reviewed in Ibis 152: 195-196), the northeast corner of which joins the Banbury area. As this can be extended southwest by the recent Avon Atlas (Bland & Dadds 2012), and as we have a new Birds of Buckinghamshire (Ferguson 2012; see Ibis 155: 683-684, 686-687) to the east, the last 10 years have produced an unprecedented and almost simultaneous swathe of detail on birds across the South Midlands. The intensity of the winter survey programme has been particularly notable. The Banbury results are presented by a combination of text, diagrams, tables and maps, the last of these based on the locally used kilometre square, not the tetrad, and artfully selected to display advances and retreats: eastward and onward for Buzzard Buteo buteo and Raven Corvus corax; conquest of the southeast for the Red Kite Milvus milvus; shrinkage for Turtle Dove Streptopelia turtur and Corn Bunting Emberiza calandra. There are unexpected revelations, such as the difference between the summer and winter distributions of the Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis. Up-to-date information is particularly useful at present for Oxfordshire, where the annual reporting system is in arrears, and for the undulating and little-known southwestern arm of Northamptonshire, where it seems to have ground temporarily to a halt. Ibis, 156, 243-261 Banbury Ornithological Society (BOS) was founded in 1951, following a series of stimulating lectures by the late Bruce Campbell, then the first full-time secretary of the BTO. BOS subsequently punched well above its weight as a flagship local bird society, mixing innovative surveys and methods of data analysis with involvement in basic BTO surveys. This timely, chunky, 200-page book and regional avifauna summarises the results from 60 years of study, 1952-2011. Trevor Easterbrook has been the driving force, with the volume dedicated to three late society stalwarts: L. Glyn Davis, Cliff Christie and Royston Scroggs. The area covered spans twelve 10-km squares based upon Banbury, roughly from Daventry, Oxford, Burford to Warwick (in a clockwise direction), spanning sections of the three counties in the 'Heart' of England. The area covers a rich array of habitats, from mixed farmland and ancient woodland fragments to some of the most picturesque villages in England, including underlying Jurassic limestone, clays and sands, and as such represents an ideal barometer of change in bird populations: 269 species recorded since 1800. The species accounts cover occurrence by month and trends in status over time. The eye-catching Great Spotted Woodpecker on the jacket cover beckons a good read for all local birders, a recommended source for conservationists in an area threatened by road, rail, air and housing development - an ideal template for other societies, visitors to this region. -- David Glue BTO This timely, chunky, 200-page book and regional avifauna summarises the results from 60 years of study, 1952-2011. The eye-catching Great Spotted Woodpecker on the jacket cover beckons a good read for all local birders, a recommended source for conservationists in an area threatened by road, rail, air and housing development - an ideal template for other societies, visitors to this region. BTO This work, published with the help of Banbury Ornithological Society, covers the period 1952-2011. Although this area does not have any significant bodies of water and consists mainly of lowland, agricultural and forest areas, this book perfectly reflects the intense and varied ornithological activity. It marvellously illustrates how the gathered information can be transposed beautifully into figures and images. In addition to the lists of mapped and described species, Birds of the Heart of England dedicates several chapters to information about habitat changes. Among these, there is a chapter explaining changes in species distribution. This book is a good example of a thorough review conducted of a relatively small area. -- Walter Belis Alauda ... this book perfectly reflects the intense and varied ornithological activity. It marvellously illustrates how the gathered information can be transposed beautifully into figures and images. In addition to the lists of mapped and described species, Birds of the Heart of England dedicates several chapters to information about habitat changes. Among these, there is a chapter explaining changes in species distribution. This book is a good example of a thorough review conducted of a relatively small area. Alauda

"About this title" may belong to another edition of this title.

Bookseller & Payment Information

Payment Methods

This bookseller accepts the following methods of payment:

  • American Express
  • MasterCard
  • Visa

[Search this Seller's Books]

[List this Seller's Books]

[Ask Seller a Question]

Bookseller: Kennys Bookstore
Address: Olney, MD, U.S.A.

AbeBooks Bookseller Since: 09 October 2009
Bookseller Rating: 5-star rating

Terms of Sale:

We guarantee the condition of every book as it's described on the Abebooks web
sites. If you're dissatisfied with your purchase (Incorrect Book/Not as
Described/Damaged) or if the order hasn't arrived, you're eligible for a refund
within 30 days of the estimated delivery date. For any queries please use the contact seller link or send an email to books@kennys.ie,

Conor Kenny


Shipping Terms:

All books securely packaged. Some books ship from Ireland.


Store Description: We carry a comprehensive range of out of print and rare books.