The wild life of Lake Superior, past and present; the habits of deer, moose, wolves, beavers, muskrats, trout, and feathered wood-folk studied with camera and flashlight

 
9781236031495: The wild life of Lake Superior, past and present; the habits of deer, moose, wolves, beavers, muskrats, trout, and feathered wood-folk studied with camera and flashlight
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1921 Excerpt: ...does not equal the number so readily taken forty years ago, with the result that the proportionately greater expenses could not now be met were it not for the extraordinary number of herring taken each fall, and these figures are significant: Herring, 1885, 300,000 pounds; 1918, 8,000,000 pounds, showing how this small and much inferior species has exchanged places with the whitefish in precisely the same period. The present rapid consumption of the herring has become doubly disastrous, for it helps financially in maintaining the fishing fleet during their concluding attack on the lake trout, and then, with the herring gone, any future effort to restore the lake trout becomes increasingly difficult, as the latter's main food supply is thus destroyed. Would it be possible to imagine conditions better adapted for the permanent exhaustion of the game and commercial fish in the finest and largest lake in the world? It has long been recognized that the lack of cooperation on the part of the States and Canadian provinces bordering on the Great Lakes accounts for this situation. With each acting separately and each naturally disposed to have laws equally liberal toward their local fishermen, it follows that the State or Province spending the least money in fish culture, or having the most improvident regulations and the least efficient system of enforcement, sets the pace for the others, while the governments of each country must sit supinely by, because lacking any authorized jurisdiction over international waters in which their respective citizens have a common interest. CANADA WILLING TO REVIVE THE TREATY It was to meet this unfortunate situation that the United States and Great Britain negotiated and ratified a boundary waters fishery treaty, but in 1914 failu...

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