The Anatomical Instructor; Or, an Illustration of the Modern and Most Approved Methods of Preparing and Preserving the Different Parts of the Human ... Distention, Articulation, Modelling, &c., Wit

 
9781150509094: The Anatomical Instructor; Or, an Illustration of the Modern and Most Approved Methods of Preparing and Preserving the Different Parts of the Human ... Distention, Articulation, Modelling, &c., Wit

This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1813. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... APPENDIX. ARTICLE I. Of preserving Preparations in Spirits of Wine and Oil of Turpentine. PREPARATIONS of almost every part are occasionallv kept in spirits, unless their size renders it impracticable, more especially diseased parts; as by this mode they undergo less change of appearance than by any other method of preservation, and consequently give the best idea of the natural or diseased appearance; but the expensiveness of the glass and spirits is a great inducement to the making of so many dry preparations. All parts intended for preservation, previous to their being put into spirits, should be macerated in water to extract the bloody colour; and the water changed from day to day, as long as the part will bear it without putrefaction, or until it becomes quite colourless; and should be freed by dissection, from all surrounding unnecessary cellular membrane, adeps, &c. which may obscure what is intended to be shewn. It should be then suspended in spirits, in a position the most favourable for exhibiting its principal parts: if it should be an hollow preparation, as a bladder, hydatid, intestine, &c. or if it should have any hollow parts, cavities, or sinuses, necessary to be shewn, such should be distended with curled hair, wool, cotton, or the like; small blood-vessels, ducts, &c. are sometimes shewn by the introduction of bristles, quills, or bougies. In this way, the several parts being put into their natural position, and suspended in spirits for a week or tea days, according to the bulk of the preparation, they become much harder and firmer in their texture; so that they will retain their position, when the hair, wool, cotton, bougies, &c. are removed, to shew the hollow parts which have been distended by them. The preparation should then be put into a ...

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

(No Available Copies)

Search Books:



Create a Want

If you know the book but cannot find it on AbeBooks, we can automatically search for it on your behalf as new inventory is added. If it is added to AbeBooks by one of our member booksellers, we will notify you!

Create a Want