The wood turner's handybook; A practical manual for workers at the lathe, embracing information on the tools, appliances, and processes employed in wood turning

 
9781130031409: The wood turner's handybook; A practical manual for workers at the lathe, embracing information on the tools, appliances, and processes employed in wood turning

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1901 Excerpt: ...face of the flange, which also bears against the work with sufficient friction to carry it round with it, and will hold firm against any moderate cut. The centrality of the disc is maintained by the cone, which bears against the inner edge of the hole in the work, and is kept there by the hexagon screw-nut. The cone itself penetrates the work till its diameter is greater than that of the hole; it then wedges the disc against the flange. This wedging force is liable to split wood which is not very tenacious, though it is not in any way detrimental to metal; and some hard woods will stand well under the pressure. To secure wood that would be split by forcing the cone in far enough to wedge sufficiently tight for turning, another piece is fitted to this chuck. This may be thus described. The screw must be considerably longer for using this piece, which consists of a cup-like casting, the hollow of which is sufficiently large to contain the hexagon nut and projecting portion of the cone. The bottom of the cup is bored to accurately fit the screw, and the edge is turned flat and true; another nut has to be provided similar to the one shown, its purpose being to force the cup against the work on the chuck. To use this extra piece, the disc is first mounted in the manner already described, with the cone screwed up just sufficiently tight to keep the work central. The cup is put on next with its edge resting against the disc. A nut being screwed on behind the cup causes its edge to grip the work and wedge it against the face of the flange. By this arrange ment a disc may be secured quite tightly, without in the least tending to split it. The broad surface of the flange will not indent any but very soft material, and even this can be protected with a disc of cardboa...

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