Admiral Vernon and the Navy; A Memoir and Vindication Being an Account of the Admiral's Career at Sea and in Parliament, with Sidelights on the Politi

 
9780217438063: Admiral Vernon and the Navy; A Memoir and Vindication Being an Account of the Admiral's Career at Sea and in Parliament, with Sidelights on the Politi
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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1907. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER XIII Misrepresentation of the Admiral's conduct--He demonstrates the truth by means of pamphlets--His criticism of the press-gang system--Condemns the treatment of British sailors--The old Navigation Acts--Results of Free Trade--Old-age pensions for seamen--Mutinies in the fleet--Smugglers of the period-- Churchwardens as naval auxiliaries--"A Specimen of Naked Truth "--Resentment of the Admiralty--Summoned to attend before the Board--Unfair removal of his name from list of flag officers--Historical criticism and critics--His popularity undiminished--Active in the House of Commons--Receives Freedom of the City of Edinburgh--Death of Admiral Vernon --Monument placed by his nephew, Lord Orwell, in Westminster Abbey. The sting of misrepresentation and injustice was destined to touch Admiral Vernon even in his wellearned retirement. Finding that it was supposed that he had been removed from his command for showing a want of energy against the French, he set himself to prepare a rebuttal of this scandalous and unfounded imputation. This he did by means of certain pamphlets. In the first of these, entitled "Some Seasonable Advice from an Honest Sailor," he reproduced all the Ml letters he had written to the Admiralty between the months of August and December, 1745. As showing his enlightenment as a naval reformer, and his courage in putting his views--however unwelcome--before the supreme authority, a few of these outspoken letters may be summarised. In a letter dated October 1o, 1745, he emphatically condemned the practice of impressing seamen, a system which Vernon (as the result of long experience) regarded as impolitic and injurious to the service. But he obeyed his orders, which were to impress every seaman he could lay his hands on. The long-boats and cu...

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