Exp Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness

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( 8,933 ratings by Goodreads )
 
9780143121862: Exp Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness

Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness tells the story of the author's mother, Nicola Fuller. Nicola Fuller and her husband were a glamorous and optimistic couple and East Africa lay before them with the promise of all its perfect light, even as the British Empire in which they both believed waned. They had everything, including two golden children - a girl and a boy. However, life became increasingly difficult and they moved to Rhodesia to work as farm managers. The previous farm manager had committed suicide. His ghost appeared at the foot of their bed and seemed to be trying to warn them of something. Shortly after this, one of their golden children died. Africa was no longer the playground of Nicola's childhood. They returned to England where the author was born before they returned to Rhodesia and to the civil war. The last part of the book sees the Fullers in their old age on a banana and fish farm in the Zambezi Valley. They had built their ramshackle dining room under the Tree of Forgetfulness. In local custom, this tree is the meeting place for villagers determined to resolve disputes. It is in the spirit of this Forgetfulness that Nicola finally forgot - but did not forgive - all her enemies including her daughter and the Apostle, a squatter who has taken up in her bananas with his seven wives and forty-nine children. Funny, tragic, terrifying, exotic and utterly unself-conscious, this is a story of survival and madness, love and war, passion and compassion.

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

Review:

"Gracefully recounted using family recollections and photos, the author plumbs the narrative with a humane and clear-eyed gaze--a lush story, largely lived within a remarkable place and time."
"--Kirkus Reviews

""Fuller achieves another beautifully wrought memoir."
"--Publishers Weekly

""Fuller's prose is so beautiful and so evocative that readers will feel that they, too, are sitting under [the Tree of Forgetfulness]. A gorgeous tribute to both her parents and the land they love."
"--Booklist

"Praise for Alexandra Fuller:
"Fuller is a brave writer who pushes the boundaries of her genre."
"--The Telegraph

""A classic is born in this tender, intensely moving and even delightful journey [Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight]. . . Fuller's book has the promise of being widely read and remaining of interest for years to come."
"-- Publishers Weekly
"

"[An] electrifying new memoir. . . . Writing in shimmering, musical prose, Ms. Fuller creates portraits of her mother, father and various eccentric relatives that are as indelible and resonant as the family portraits in classic contemporary memoirs like Mary Karr's Liars' Club and Andre Aciman's Out of Egypt."
--Michiko Kakutani, "The""New York Times"
"Rewarding. . . . A love story to Africa and her family. She plumbs her family story with humor, memory, old photographs and a no-nonsense attitude toward family foibles, follies and tragedy. The reader is rewarded with an intimate family story played out against an extraordinary landscape, told with remarkable grace and style."
--"Star Tribune "(Minneapolis)
"Another stunner. . . . Alexandra Fuller, master memoirist, brings her readers new pleasure."
--"The Plain Dealer "(Cleveland)
"Gracefully recounted using family recollections and photos, the author plumbs the narrative with a humane and clear-eyedr

"[A]n artistic and emotional feat."--THE BOSTON GLOBE

"[Fuller]""conveys the magnetic pull that Africa could exert on the colonials who had a taste for it, the powerful feeling of attachment. She does not really explain that feeling--she is a writer who shows rather than tells--but through incident and anecdote she makes its effects clear, and its costs."--THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

"An eccentric, quixotic and downright dangerous tale with full room for humor, love and more than a few highballs."--HUFFINGTON POST

"Fuller''s narrative is a love story to Africa and her family. She plumbs her family story with humor, memory, old photographs and a no-nonsense attitude toward family foibles, follies and tragedy. The reader is rewarded with an intimate family story played out against an extraordinary landscape, told with remarkable grace and style."--MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE

"Another stunner... The writer''s finesse at handling the element of time is brilliant, as she interweaves near-present-day incidents with stories set in the past. Both are equally vivid... With "Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness" Alexandra Fuller, master memoirist, brings her readers new pleasure. Her mum should be pleased."
--CLEVELAND PLAIN-DEALER

"Another stunner... The writer's finesse at handling the element of time is brilliant, as she interweaves near-present-day incidents with stories set in the past. Both are equally vivid... With "Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness" Alexandra Fuller, master memoirist, brings her readers new pleasure. Her mum should be pleased."
--CLEVELAND PLAIN-DEALER

"Fuller's narrative is a love story to Africa and her family. She plumbs her family story with humor, memory, old photographs and a no-nonsense attitude toward family foibles, follies and tragedy. The reader is rewarded with an intimate family story played out against an extraordinary landscape, told with remarkable grace and style."--MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE

"Ten years after publishing "Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood," Alexandra (Bobo) Fuller treats us in this wonderful book to the inside scoop on her glamorous, tragic, indomitable mother...Bobo skillfully weaves together the story of her romantic, doomed family against the background of her mother's remembered childhood."--THE WASHINGTON POST

Electrifying Writing in shimmering, musical prose Ms. Fuller manages the difficult feat of writing about her mother and father with love and understanding, while at the same time conveying the terrible human costs of the colonialism they supported Although Ms. Fuller would move to America with her husband in 1994, her own love for Africa reverberates throughout these pages, making the beauty and hazards of that land searingly real for the reader. Michiko Kakutani, THE NEW YORK TIMES
Ten years after publishing "Don t Let s Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood," Alexandra (Bobo) Fuller treats us in this wonderful book to the inside scoop on her glamorous, tragic, indomitable mother Bobo skillfully weaves together the story of her romantic, doomed family against the background of her mother s remembered childhood. THE WASHINGTON POST
Another stunner The writer's finesse at handling the element of time is brilliant, as she interweaves near-present-day incidents with stories set in the past. Both are equally vivid With "Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness" Alexandra Fuller, master memoirist, brings her readers new pleasure. Her mum should be pleased.
CLEVELAND PLAIN-DEALER
Fuller's narrative is a love story to Africa and her family. She plumbs her family story with humor, memory, old photographs and a no-nonsense attitude toward family foibles, follies and tragedy. The reader is rewarded with an intimate family story played out against an extraordinary landscape, told with remarkable grace and style. MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE
[Fuller]" "conveys the magnetic pull that Africa could exert on the colonials who had a taste for it, the powerful feeling of attachment. She does not really explain that feeling she is a writer who shows rather than tells but through incident and anecdote she makes its effects clear, and its costs. THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
[A]n artistic and emotional feat. THE BOSTON GLOBE
An eccentric, quixotic and downright dangerous tale with full room for humor, love and more than a few highballs. HUFFINGTON POST"

Electrifying Writing in shimmering, musical prose Ms. Fuller manages the difficult feat of writing about her mother and father with love and understanding, while at the same time conveying the terrible human costs of the colonialism they supported Although Ms. Fuller would move to America with her husband in 1994, her own love for Africa reverberates throughout these pages, making the beauty and hazards of that land searingly real for the reader. Michiko Kakutani, THE NEW YORK TIMES
Ten years after publishing Don t Let s Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood, Alexandra (Bobo) Fuller treats us in this wonderful book to the inside scoop on her glamorous, tragic, indomitable mother Bobo skillfully weaves together the story of her romantic, doomed family against the background of her mother s remembered childhood. THE WASHINGTON POST
Another stunner The writer's finesse at handling the element of time is brilliant, as she interweaves near-present-day incidents with stories set in the past. Both are equally vivid With "Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness" Alexandra Fuller, master memoirist, brings her readers new pleasure. Her mum should be pleased.
CLEVELAND PLAIN-DEALER
Fuller's narrative is a love story to Africa and her family. She plumbs her family story with humor, memory, old photographs and a no-nonsense attitude toward family foibles, follies and tragedy. The reader is rewarded with an intimate family story played out against an extraordinary landscape, told with remarkable grace and style. MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE
[Fuller] conveys the magnetic pull that Africa could exert on the colonials who had a taste for it, the powerful feeling of attachment. She does not really explain that feeling she is a writer who shows rather than tells but through incident and anecdote she makes its effects clear, and its costs. THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
[A]n artistic and emotional feat. THE BOSTON GLOBE
An eccentric, quixotic and downright dangerous tale with full room for humor, love and more than a few highballs. HUFFINGTON POST"

-Electrifying...Writing in shimmering, musical prose... Ms. Fuller manages the difficult feat of writing about her mother and father with love and understanding, while at the same time conveying the terrible human costs of the colonialism they supported... Although Ms. Fuller would move to America with her husband in 1994, her own love for Africa reverberates throughout these pages, making the beauty and hazards of that land searingly real for the reader.-
--Michiko Kakutani, THE NEW YORK TIMES
-Ten years after publishing Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood, Alexandra (Bobo) Fuller treats us in this wonderful book to the inside scoop on her glamorous, tragic, indomitable mother...Bobo skillfully weaves together the story of her romantic, doomed family against the background of her mother's remembered childhood.-
--THE WASHINGTON POST
-Another stunner... The writer's finesse at handling the element of time is brilliant, as she interweaves near-present-day incidents with stories set in the past. Both are equally vivid... With -Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness- Alexandra Fuller, master memoirist, brings her readers new pleasure. Her mum should be pleased.-
--CLEVELAND PLAIN-DEALER
-Fuller's narrative is a love story to Africa and her family. She plumbs her family story with humor, memory, old photographs and a no-nonsense attitude toward family foibles, follies and tragedy. The reader is rewarded with an intimate family story played out against an extraordinary landscape, told with remarkable grace and style.-
--MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE
-[Fuller] conveys the magnetic pull that Africa could exert on the colonials who had a taste for it, the powerful feeling of attachment. She does not really explain that feeling--she is a writer who shows rather than tells--but through incident and anecdote she makes its effects clear, and its costs.-
--THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
-[A]n artistic and emotional feat.-
--THE BOSTON GLOBE
-An eccentric, quixotic and downright dangerous tale with full room for humor, love and more than a few highballs.-
--HUFFINGTON POST
-Cocktail Hour [Under the Tree of Forgetfulness] subtly explores the intersections of personality, history, and landscape in ways that are continually fresh and thoughtful.-
--CHARLESTON POST AND COURIER
-Gracefully recounted using family recollections and photos, the author plumbs the narrative with a humane and clear-eyed gaze--a lush story, largely lived within a remarkable place and time.-
--KIRKUS REVIEWS
-In this sequel to her 2001 memoir, Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight, which her unflattered mum calls the 'Awful Book, ' Duller gives a warm yet wry account of her British parents' arduous life in Africa. . . . With searing honesty and in blazingly vibrant prose, Fuller re-creates her mother's glorified Kenyan girlhood and visits her forever-wild parents at their Zambian banana and fish farm today. The result is an entirely Awesome Book.-
--MORE MAGAZINE
-Fuller brings Africa to life, both its natural splendor and the harsher realities of day-to-day existence, and sheds light on her parents in all their humanness--not a glaring sort of light, but the soft equatorial kind she so beautifully describes in this memoir.-
--BOOKPAGE
-Fuller revisits her vibrant, spirited parents, first introduced in Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight (2001), which her mother referred to as that 'awful book'. . . . This time around, Nicola is well aware her daughter is writing another memoir, and shares some of her memories under the titular Tree of Forgetfulness, which looms large by the elder Fullers' house in Zambia. Fuller's prose is so beautiful and so evocative that readers will feel that they, too, are sitting under that tree. A gorgeous tribute to both her parents and the land they love.-
--BOOKLIST (starred review)
-A sardonic follow-up to her first memoir about growing up in Rhodesia circa the 1970s, Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight, this work traces in wry, poignant fashion the lives of her intrepid British parents. . . . Fuller achieves another beautifully wrought memoir.-
--PUBLISHERS WEEKLY (starred review)

"Electrifying...Writing in shimmering, musical prose... Ms. Fuller manages the difficult feat of writing about her mother and father with love and understanding, while at the same time conveying the terrible human costs of the colonialism they supported... Although Ms. Fuller would move to America with her husband in 1994, her own love for Africa reverberates throughout these pages, making the beauty and hazards of that land searingly real for the reader."
--Michiko Kakutani, THE NEW YORK TIMES
"Ten years after publishing Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood, Alexandra (Bobo) Fuller treats us in this wonderful book to the inside scoop on her glamorous, tragic, indomitable mother...Bobo skillfully weaves together the story of her romantic, doomed family against the background of her mother's remembered childhood."
--THE WASHINGTON POST
"Another stunner... The writer's finesse at handling the element of time is brilliant, as she interweaves near-present-day incidents with stories set in the past. Both are equally vivid... With "Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness" Alexandra Fuller, master memoirist, brings her readers new pleasure. Her mum should be pleased."
--CLEVELAND PLAIN-DEALER
"Fuller's narrative is a love story to Africa and her family. She plumbs her family story with humor, memory, old photographs and a no-nonsense attitude toward family foibles, follies and tragedy. The reader is rewarded with an intimate family story played out against an extraordinary landscape, told with remarkable grace and style."
--MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE
"[Fuller] conveys the magnetic pull that Africa could exert on the colonials who had a taste for it, the powerful feeling of attachment. She does not really explain that feeling--she is a writer who shows rather than tells--but through incident and anecdote she makes its effects clear, and its costs."
--THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
"[A]n artistic and emotional feat."
--THE BOSTON GLOBE
"An eccentric, quixotic and downright dangerous tale with full room for humor, love and more than a few highballs."
--HUFFINGTON POST
"Cocktail Hour [Under the Tree of Forgetfulness] subtly explores the intersections of personality, history, and landscape in ways that are continually fresh and thoughtful."
--CHARLESTON POST AND COURIER
"Gracefully recounted using family recollections and photos, the author plumbs the narrative with a humane and clear-eyed gaze--a lush story, largely lived within a remarkable place and time."
--KIRKUS REVIEWS
"In this sequel to her 2001 memoir, Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight, which her unflattered mum calls the 'Awful Book, ' Duller gives a warm yet wry account of her ...

Review:

`Despite its tragic backbone, this book has much more humour than its predecessor. Fuller gives her mother a droll, laconic voice that makes it a pleasure to read. Her achievement is to have turned her mother's complicated, gallant life into a deeply felt memoir with perfect comic timing' --Sunday Times

`Nicola, Fuller, the last of her kind, booms and bosses her way through these beautifully written pages, a comic-tragic patriot of no clear nationality permanently out of place in the place she refuse to leave, at home in her own homelessness. Her parents, Fuller accepts, belong to a generation that was selfish and short-sighted but, as he puts it, "most of us don't pay so dearly of our prejudices, our passions, our mistakes. Lots of places, you can harbour the most ridiculous, the most ruining, the most intolerant beliefs and be hurt by nothing more than your own thoughts' --Daily Telegraph

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Alexandra Fuller
Published by Penguin (Non-Classics) (2012)
ISBN 10: 0143121863 ISBN 13: 9780143121862
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Book Description Penguin (Non-Classics), 2012. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Bookseller Inventory # P110143121863

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