The Protection of Persons against Ionising Radiation Arising from Any Work Activity: The Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985

 
9780118838382: The Protection of Persons against Ionising Radiation Arising from Any Work Activity: The Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985

Top Search Results from the AbeBooks Marketplace

1.

Great Britain
Published by HSE Books (1985)
ISBN 10: 0118838385 ISBN 13: 9780118838382
Used Softcover Quantity Available: 1
Seller
Anybook Ltd.
(Lincoln, United Kingdom)
Rating
[?]

Book Description HSE Books, 1985. Book Condition: Fair. This is an ex-library book and may have the usual library/used-book markings inside.This book has soft covers. In fair condition, suitable as a study copy. Bookseller Inventory # 3831214

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy Used
7.95
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: 6.10
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

2.

anon
Published by H.M.S.O. (1985)
ISBN 10: 0118838385 ISBN 13: 9780118838382
Used Pictorial Soft Cover Quantity Available: 1
Seller
Hanselled Books
(Burntisland, FIFE, United Kingdom)
Rating
[?]

Book Description H.M.S.O., 1985. Pictorial Soft Cover. Book Condition: Very Good. 40pp.PrefaceRadiation protection is concerned with the protection of people both individually and in general against detrimental effects of exposure to radiation, while still allowing necessary activities from which radiation exposure might arise. The effects of radiation exposure can be of two types. On the one hand there is the type of effect (called stochastic) for which the probability of occurrence is a function of the dose received. At the dose range involved in radiation protection of workers and those affected by work activities hereditary effects and carcinogenesis are regarded as being of this type. On the other hand there is a type of effect (called non-stochastic) of which the severity depends on the dose received, but for which there is no effect below a certain threshold. Cataracts and skin ulcerations are examples of this type. In order to minimise both of these effects the primary aim of the Regulations and this Code of Practice is to introduce conditions whereby doses of ionising radiation can be maintained at an acceptable level considerably below the threshold value for the latter type of effect and where the probability of occurrence of the former type of effect is extremely low. It should be remembered that by far the largest contribution to population dose is from our natural background, e.g. cosmic radiation, external radiation of terrestrial origin and internal radiation from natural radionuclides in the body; the Regulations are only concerned with ionising radiation arising from a work activity. The Regulations contain the fundamental requirements needed to control exposure to ionising radiation. Details of acceptable methods of meeting those requirements are given in the supporting Code. In each case compliance with a Regulation may be achieved by a method other than that described in the Code thus allowing account to be taken of the latest practices adopted through advancing knowledge. The guidance in the Code attempts to avoid essentially reproducing the wording of a regulatory provision which is conditioned by the words 'where reasonably practicable' (or similar): in such cases it has seemed sufficient and appropriate simply to specify the action advocated. In cases where alternative methods of achieving the regulatory objective are described but where one method is preferred the preferred method is recommended, with an acknowledgement that where this method is not reasonably practicable the alternative method described is acceptable. Radiation protection is based on three general principles: (a)every practice resulting in an exposure to ionising radiation shall be justified by the advantages it produces; (b)all exposures shall be kept as low as reasonably achievable; (c)the sum of doses and committed doses received shall not exceed certain limits. The basic principle in the Regulations, that all necessary steps shall be taken to reduce, so far as reasonably practicable, the extent to which people are exposed to ionising radiation, reflects principles (a) and (b) and means that it is not sufficient merely to observe dose limits. Thus, those whose undertakings cause people to be exposed to ionising radiation have a duty to weigh the costs of the possible health detriment from exposure against the costs of reducing or eliminating that exposure (taking into account possible risks to health and safety. Bookseller Inventory # 055358

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy Used
10
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: 5.50
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds