The Metamorphosis, in the Penal Colony, and Other Stories

4.02 avg rating
( 13,229 ratings by Goodreads )
 
9780020218074: The Metamorphosis, in the Penal Colony, and Other Stories

"When Gregor Samsa woke up one morning from unsettling dreams, he found himself changed in his bed into a monstrous vermin." With this startling, bizarre, yet surprisingly funny first sentence, Kafka begins his masterpiece, "The Metamorphosis." It is the story of a young man who, transformed overnight into a giant beetlelike insect, becomes an object of disgrace to his family, an outsider in his own home, a quintessentially alienated man. A harrowing -- though absurdly comic -- meditation on human feelings of inadequecy, guilt, and isolation, "The Metamorphosis" has taken its place as one of the mosst widely read and influential works of twentieth-century fiction. As W.H. Auden wrote, "Kafka is important to us because his predicament is the predicament of modern man."

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

Review:

"Kafka's survey of the insectile situation of young Jews in inner Bohemia can hardly be improved upon: 'With their posterior legs they were still glued to their father's Jewishness and with their wavering anterior legs they found no new ground.' There is a sense in which Kafka's Jewish question ('What have I in common with Jews?') has become everybody's question, Jewish alienation the template for all our doubts. What is Muslimness? What is femaleness? What is Polishness? These days we all find our anterior legs flailing before us. We're all insects, all "Ungeziefer, "now."
--Zadie Smith
"Kafka engaged in no technical experiments whatsoever; without in any way changing the German language, he stripped it of its involved constructions until it became clear and simple, like everyday speech purified of slang and negligence. The common experience of Kafka's readers is one of general and vague fascination, even in stories they fail to understand, a precise recollection of strange and seemingly absurd images and descriptions--until one day the hidden meaning reveals itself to them with the sudden evidence of a truth simple and incontestable."
--Hannah Arendt

Kafka s survey of the insectile situation of young Jews in inner Bohemia can hardly be improved upon: With their posterior legs they were still glued to their father s Jewishness and with their wavering anterior legs they found no new ground. There is a sense in which Kafka s Jewish question ( What have I in common with Jews? ) has become everybody s question, Jewish alienation the template for all our doubts. What is Muslimness? What is femaleness? What is Polishness? These days we all find our anterior legs flailing before us. We re all insects, all "Ungeziefer, "now.
Zadie Smith
Kafka engaged in no technical experiments whatsoever; without in any way changing the German language, he stripped it of its involved constructions until it became clear and simple, like everyday speech purified of slang and negligence. The common experience of Kafka s readers is one of general and vague fascination, even in stories they fail to understand, a precise recollection of strange and seemingly absurd images and descriptions until one day the hidden meaning reveals itself to them with the sudden evidence of a truth simple and incontestable.
Hannah Arendt"

Kafka s survey of the insectile situation of young Jews in inner Bohemia can hardly be improved upon: With their posterior legs they were still glued to their father s Jewishness and with their wavering anterior legs they found no new ground. There is a sense in which Kafka s Jewish question ( What have I in common with Jews? ) has become everybody s question, Jewish alienation the template for all our doubts. What is Muslimness? What is femaleness? What is Polishness? These days we all find our anterior legs flailing before us. We re all insects, all Ungeziefer, now.
Zadie Smith
Kafka engaged in no technical experiments whatsoever; without in any way changing the German language, he stripped it of its involved constructions until it became clear and simple, like everyday speech purified of slang and negligence. The common experience of Kafka s readers is one of general and vague fascination, even in stories they fail to understand, a precise recollection of strange and seemingly absurd images and descriptions until one day the hidden meaning reveals itself to them with the sudden evidence of a truth simple and incontestable.
Hannah Arendt

"

"Kafka's survey of the insectile situation of young Jews in inner Bohemia can hardly be improved upon: 'With their posterior legs they were still glued to their father's Jewishness and with their wavering anterior legs they found no new ground.' There is a sense in which Kafka's Jewish question ('What have I in common with Jews?') has become everybody's question, Jewish alienation the template for all our doubts. What is Muslimness? What is femaleness? What is Polishness? These days we all find our anterior legs flailing before us. We're all insects, all Ungeziefer, now."
--Zadie Smith
"Kafka engaged in no technical experiments whatsoever; without in any way changing the German language, he stripped it of its involved constructions until it became clear and simple, like everyday speech purified of slang and negligence. The common experience of Kafka's readers is one of general and vague fascination, even in stories they fail to understand, a precise recollection of strange and seemingly absurd images and descriptions--until one day the hidden meaning reveals itself to them with the sudden evidence of a truth simple and incontestable."
--Hannah Arendt



-Kafka's survey of the insectile situation of young Jews in inner Bohemia can hardly be improved upon: 'With their posterior legs they were still glued to their father's Jewishness and with their wavering anterior legs they found no new ground.' There is a sense in which Kafka's Jewish question ('What have I in common with Jews?') has become everybody's question, Jewish alienation the template for all our doubts. What is Muslimness? What is femaleness? What is Polishness? These days we all find our anterior legs flailing before us. We're all insects, all Ungeziefer, now.-
--Zadie Smith
-Kafka engaged in no technical experiments whatsoever; without in any way changing the German language, he stripped it of its involved constructions until it became clear and simple, like everyday speech purified of slang and negligence. The common experience of Kafka's readers is one of general and vague fascination, even in stories they fail to understand, a precise recollection of strange and seemingly absurd images and descriptions--until one day the hidden meaning reveals itself to them with the sudden evidence of a truth simple and incontestable.-
--Hannah Arendt

About the Author:

Anne Rice (Foreword) is a best-selling American author of gothic and later religious themed books. Best known for her Vampire Chronicles, her prevailing thematical focus is on love, death, immortality, existentialism, and the human condition. Her books have sold nearly 100 million copies, making her one of the most widely read authors in modern history.

"About this title" may belong to another edition of this title.

Top Search Results from the AbeBooks Marketplace

1.

Franz Kafka
Published by Scribner Paperback Fiction, Si (1995)
ISBN 10: 0020218079 ISBN 13: 9780020218074
New Paperback Quantity Available: 2
Seller
Murray Media
(North Miami Beach, FL, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Scribner Paperback Fiction, Si, 1995. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Bookseller Inventory # P110020218079

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
33.41
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: 2.34
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

2.

Kafka, Franz
Published by Scribner Paperback Fiction, Simon & Schuster
ISBN 10: 0020218079 ISBN 13: 9780020218074
New PAPERBACK Quantity Available: 1
Seller
Cloud 9 Books
(Wellington, FL, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Scribner Paperback Fiction, Simon & Schuster. PAPERBACK. Book Condition: New. 0020218079 New Condition. Bookseller Inventory # NEW6.1011789

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
48.26
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: 3.90
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

3.

Franz Kafka, Joachim Neugroschel (Translator)
Published by Scribner Paperback Fiction, Simon & Schuster (1995)
ISBN 10: 0020218079 ISBN 13: 9780020218074
New Paperback Quantity Available: 1
Seller
Ergodebooks
(RICHMOND, TX, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Scribner Paperback Fiction, Simon & Schuster, 1995. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Bookseller Inventory # DADAX0020218079

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
63.97
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: 3.12
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

4.

Kafka, Franz
Published by Scribner Paperback Fiction, Simon & Schuster 1995-04-20 (1995)
ISBN 10: 0020218079 ISBN 13: 9780020218074
New Paperback Quantity Available: 1
Seller
M and N Media
(Acworth, GA, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Scribner Paperback Fiction, Simon & Schuster 1995-04-20, 1995. Paperback. Book Condition: New. 2nd. 0020218079 We guarantee all of our items - customer service and satisfaction are our top priorities. Please allow 4 - 14 business days for Standard shipping, within the US. Bookseller Inventory # TM-0020218079

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
70.78
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: 3.12
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds