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Book Description: Paris: Arthus Bertrand, 1826 [but printed in 1804-1805]., 1826. 3 volumes. 2 text volumes: 8vo (8 x 5 inches). Half-titles. Half tan calf, marbled boards, gilt (extremities rubbed); preserved in brown morocco backed slipcase and chemise. Atlas: Folio (15 x 12 inches). 4 letterpress leaves including the title-page and plate list in French and English. 11 fine folding engraved maps, 14 engraved plans, and 11 engraved plates (8 views, 3 figures of native Americans), all engraved by Tardieu (folding maps with some very mild offsetting, North America map with slight fold tear, paper flaw to Part II of Ohio River map with small loss to blank area, guards renewed, very mild occasional foxing or marginal spotting, text leaves toned). Contemporary half vellum, marbled paper boards uniform with text volumes, citron and red morocco lettering-pieces on the spine (extremities rubbed). Provenance: John B. Stetson, his sale Parke-Bernet, 14 April 1953, lot 207; sold by Henry Stevens in 1953 to Frank T. Siebert; text volumes purchased by Siebert from Maggs Bros., his sale, Sotheby's New York, Oct 28, 1999, lot 819; with the signed bookplate of Bruce McKinney loosely inserted, his sale 2nd December 2010, lot 150 A PARTICULARLY FINE AND ATTRACTIVE COPY WITH A SUPERB PROVENANCE of the first edition, in French, with the RARE atlas volume which accompanies Collot's account of his extensive survey of the Louisiana region, including his celebrated map on three sheets of the Ohio River: "The beautifully executed map of the Ohio River [on three sheets] depicts vividly the wilderness that this country was at the time of his journey" (Wagner-Camp). The other remarkable maps include a general map of North America; the course of the Ohio from its source to its junction with the Mississippi; the road from Limestone to Frankfort in Kentucky; a stretch of a branch of the river Juniata; a map of the course of the Mississippi from the Missouri to its mouth; a map of Illinois country; a map of the Missouri and of the higher parts of the Mississippi and the plain where the waters divide to run north-east to Hudson's Bay, north-north-west to the Frozen Sea, and south into the gulf of Mexico, and showing Mackenzie's route of 1789; a chart of the sources of the Mobile and of the Yazoo. Fine plans of most important forts are included: Erie, Niagara, Natchez, New Madrid or Anse a la Graisse, and Baton-Rouge. As are plans of the towns of Pittsburgh, St.-Louis, and a sketch of New Orleans. Collot, who served under Rochambeau during the Revolutionary War, was commissioned to make a reconnaissance of the Mississippi valley by Pierre Auguste Adet (1763-1834), French ambassador to the United States. He was to report of the political, economic and military situation in the region, which was under Spanish control, in anticipation of the reacquisition of Louisiana by France from Spain. But as a result of the Louisiana Purchase, however, the "work was printed, both in French . and English, but not published, at the time of Gen. Collot's death, which happened in 1805. More than twenty years afterwards, the whole impression came into the hands of M. Bertrand, an eminent publisher in Paris, who reserved 100 copies of the English and 300 of the French edition, and made waste paper of the remainder" (Rich, Bibliotheca Americana Nova, 2: p. 185). Howes C-601; Sabin 14460; Wagner-Camp 31a. Catalogued by Catalogued by Kate Hunter at Arader Galleries. Bookseller Inventory # 72lib547

2.

Purchas his Pilgrimes. In five bookes. - Purchase his Pilgrimage.

PURCHAS, Samuel (ca 1575-1626).
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Book Description: London: William Stansby for Henrie Fetherstone, 1625 - 1626., 1626. Together, 5 volumes. Folio (13 x 8 1/8 inches). Additional engraved title-page (re-margined at foot), FINE double-page folding engraved map of "Virginia" by John Smith (21 4/8 x 16 inches to the neatline, 13 6/8 x 17 2/8 inches sheet size), AN EARLY STATE PRECEDING THAT INTENDED FOR PUBLICATION WITH PURCHAS: Church state 4, Burden state 6, with UNUSUALLY WIDE MARGINS SHOWING THE PLATE-MARK (an early repair to verso at the bottom of the centerfold, small hole at the fold, and one or two other separations along the horizontal fold, one or two spots), 6 double-page maps, including "Hondius his Map of the Christian World", 81 maps in the text, engraved and woodcut illustrations, head- and tail-pieces and initials (without 4 leaves: blanks vol. 1 1, vol. 3 [pi]1, and vol. 4 1, and colophon vol. 2 2e4; approximately 30 leaves with small marginal tissue strengthening, approximately 25 leaves with marginal areas renewed, 2 brief marginal worm trails repaired, 2 final leaves repaired affecting a few letters, New England/Canada and Virginia maps strengthened on verso and with short separations, 2 inset maps shaved at fore-edge, a third with hole repaired affecting a few words on verso). Late 19th-century pebble-grained morocco gilt by J. Clarke of Bedford, gilt dentelles (bindings lightly rubbed). Provenance: George Smith, his sale Sotheby's July 1867, lot 6479; John Dunn-Gardner (1811-1903), MP and extensive landowner in Cambridgeshire, England, with his pencilled notes re provenance at the end of volume one; his sale, London, 1854, sold for £75; with the engraved armorial bookplate of Sir Edward Sullivan (1822-1885), who describes this copy in a manuscript note tipped-in at the end: "perhaps the finest extant.it is quite perfect. the Royal Arms were on the old calf covers", his sale, London, June 6, 1890, lot 5146. "One of the fullest and most important collections of early voyages and travels in the English language" (Sabin) First edition of Purchas his "Pilgrimes." and fourth edition of the "Pilgrimage.", issued simultaneously as a supplement. Early issue of "Pilgrimes" with "Hondius his Map of the Christian World" in volume one, pages 65 and 115, 2T6 incorrectly numbered, and the headline on page 704 reading "Hollanders lying devices," but with second issue of engraved title-page, an unusually complete copy, the only significant absence being the colophon to volume 2, which is frequently missing. Second issue of the "Pilgrimage." with dedication to King Charles. Material relating to America begins in book III, about halfway through volume III with an account of George Barkley's travels, accompanied by a map of the arctic regions "Polus Arcticus." . Book IV entitled "English Northerne Navigations, and Discoveries, Relations of Greeneland, Groenland, The North-West Passage, and other Arctike Regions, with later Russian Occurrents" is illustrated with Henry Briggs's double-page map of "The North part of America." This map is best known for being the progenitor of the myth of California as an island, but since it may have been published as early as 1622 it is also proposed as the first map to name "Hudsons bay", "Fretum Hudson", "Hudsons R", "Cape Cod", and "De la war bay" (Burden 314). Book V concerns the "Voyages, and Travels to and in the New World, called America: relations of their Pagan Antiquities and of the regions and plantations in the North and South parts thereof, and of the Seas and Islands adiacent". It is illustrated with "Hondius his Map Of America", "Hondius his Map of Hispaniola, Cuba, &c", "Hondius his Map of Florida", "Hondius his Map of New Spaine", "Hondius his Map of America Meridionalis", "Hondius his Map of the Magellan Streight", and numerous woodcuts of Mexican art and hieroglyphics. The fourth volume, containing books VI to X includes many famous accounts of voyages of exploration to and in the New World, and is famously illustrated with JOHN SMITH'S MAP OF "VIRGINIA", IN AN EARLY STATE PRECEDING THAT INTEND. Bookseller Inventory # 72lib258

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Book Description: London: Printed and sold by R. Sayer & J. Bennett, 1776., 1776. Broadsheets (22 x 16 inches). 30 engraved double and/or folding maps as called for in the "Index", hand-colored in outline, three additionally hand-colored in part, by Henry Mouzon, Joshua Fry & Peter Jefferson, William Scull, Thomas Jefferys, Samuel Holland and others (some light spotting, fore-edge of No. 23 strengthened. Contemporary green morocco-backed, marbled paper boards, gilt (rebacked preserving the original backstrip, extremities a bit scuffed). Second edition, with most maps dated 1775 and maps number 5 and 6 "An Accurate Map of North America" conforming to those of the first edition. After the British victory in the French and Indian War (1756-1763), and under the terms of the 1762 Treaty of Fontainebleau and the Treaty of Paris signed the following year, Britain's colonial Empire now encompassed all land east of the Mississippi River. The potential for trade and development was enormous and the British and their colonists were quick to recognize this. Scientific surveys were undertaken which not only recorded the topography of the land but also information on roads, towns, mills, and any other feature that might be of use. For the first time the interior and not just the coast was explored and mapped, thus extending British knowledge of their new territorial acquisitions as well as the land already in their possession. The resulting maps were generally the best available for their respective areas and for the period. All were published separately by Thomas Jefferys, who as Geographer to the Prince of Wales and later Geographer to the King, was privy to the surveys. In cartographic style and presentation the maps vary greatly, reflecting the many cartographers who compiled them. Together they provided a comprehensive cartographic record of the English colonies by the outbreak of the American Revolution. The decision to issue the maps together in the "American Atlas" was taken by Jefferys's successor Robert Sayer and John Bennett. Public interest in the unrest fermenting in Britain's American colonies as well as military necessity fuelled their decision. Each colony, various other regions and the entire continent were gloriously displayed in exacting detail. Indeed, the maps were so good, they were used by British, American, and French military officers and civil officials during the war. Thus, the importance of this seminal atlas cannot be over emphasized. "The American Atlas" is the single most important cartographic document charting the British colonies at the time of the War for Independence. The maps contained in the America Atlas are the following: Nos. 1-3: A chart of North and South America, including the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, with the nearest coasts of Europe, Africa, and Asia. [Comprehending the Icy-sea, with adjacent coasts of Asia and America, taken from the map published at Petersburg in 1774, by Mr. J. von Staehlin, secretary to the imperial academy] [by John Green. anon.] 1775. 3 maps. No. 4: The Russian discoveries from the map published by the imperial academy of St. Petersburg. 1775. Nos. 5-6: An accurate map of North America, describing. the British and Spanish Dominions. by Eman Bowen . and John Gibson. 1775. 2 maps - Insets: A particular map of Baffin and Hudson's bay. - The passage by land to California discover'd by father Eusebius Francis Kino. . . between the years 1698 and 1701. No. 7: North America from the French of Mr. d'Anville, improved with the English surveys made since the peace. 1775. No. 8: A map of the British empire in North America by Samuel Dunn. . . improved from the surveys of Capt. Carver. 1776. No. 9: An exact chart of the river St. Lawrence, from Fort Frontenac to the island of Anicosti showing the soundings, rocks. . . and all necessary instructions for navigating that river to Quebec. . . by. . . Thos. Jefferys. 1775. Insets: The Seven islands. A continuation of the river from Quebec to lake Ontario taken from the original. . . by Mr. d'Anville. 1755. St. Nicho. Bookseller Inventory # 000370

4.

Dell'arcano del mare [Books 1-4].

DUDLEY, Robert 1573-1649.
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Book Description: Firenze: Francesco Onofri, 1646., 1646. 2 volumes [of an eventual 3] in one. Folio (13 x 9 4/8 inches). Half-title, title-page dated 1646, with fine engraved vignette of a compass (without half-title and title-page to volume 2, ie Books 3-4, and errata leaf at end, dampstaining to half-title, title-page and folding engraved patent plate, some minor and occasional spotting), folding engraved facsimile of the patent of nobility granted to Dudley in 1620 by Ferdinand II, 15 engraved folding charts in Book 2, including 5 double-sheet, and 66 (of 69) engraved plates by Antonio Francesco Lucini, various sizes, 49 folding, the plates variously numbered (see Phillips), , including 30 plates of astronomical or nautical instrument designs with volvelles, pointers or string-pointers, 7 double-sheet plates of diagrams of ship-building in Book 4, and one very small engraved diagram pasted down in lower margin of folio I2 in Book 4, four plates in Book 1 with letterpress text on versos, 5 inserted unnumbered leaves in Book 3 containing 10 letterpress diagrams of naval formations (without 2 plates in volume one, and one folding plate in Book 4, three plates with tears near the gutter, map of the Americas with small tear at fold juncture, a few of the double-sheet maps slightly browned along sheet junctures from original paste, else EXCEPTIONALLY FINE). Contemporary vellum, manuscript title on spine, edges stained red (a bit creased, especially at the extremities, and with a few pale stains, pastedowns torn). Provenance: with the near contemporary ownership inscription of the library of the Colegio Mayore Cuenca in Salamanca ("En la libreria del Colegio . Cuenca") on the title-page, numbering to the plates, and extensive underscoring and a few marginal notes in red pencil throughout. "THE ONLY EXCEPTION TO THE TOTAL DOMINANCE OF DUTCH SEA ATLAS PRODUCTION." (Burden) First edition of Books 1-4 of an eventual 6 (Books 5 and 6 being published later because the European charts needed updating). Dudley's great, and rare, sea-atlas "Dell' Arcano del Mare" or "Secrets of the Sea", is the first sea-atlas compiled by an Englishman, the first atlas to show the charts constructed on the Mercator projection, the first to show prevailing winds and currents in the principal harbors, and the first to give magnetic declination. The 15 maps in book 2 consist of large-scale maps of the four continents; five relate to the Americas, including "Carta prima Generale d'America." of Central America and Peru with a detailed inset showing the Californian coast, which is the first printed sea chart of the west coast of North America (Burden 266), and "Carta seconda Generale del' America." of the eastern seaboard that is the first printed sea chart by an Englishman of the eastern North American coast, as well as the first to methodically record soundings. The soundings in Chesapeake Bay are recorded only here: they are "curiously lacking in the more detailed chart published in the sixth part. The most interesting area is that of New York where any indication of the Dutch presence is removed" (Burden 267). The Hudson River is named in deference to its discoverer, rather than the Dutch "Noort River". In the dedicatory epistle to the second edition of 1661 the engraver Lucini stated that "he worked on the plates in seclusion for twelve years in an obscure Tuscan village, using no less than 5,000 pounds of copper in the making" (Phillips). The sources for Dudley's maps were clearly wide and varied, his position in society gave him admission to many quarters, and it has been proposed that these include his cousin Thomas Cavendish (the third circumnavigator of the world), it has even been suggested that Dudley had access to Henry Hudson's notes, and Sir Francis Drake's papers, although it is more likely that the charts of John Daniell, that still reside in Florence were the source for the important "Carta prima Generale d'America." Phillips 457; Burden 266-267; Nordenskiöld Collection, 7. For more information about. Bookseller Inventory # 002406

5.

Sketches in North America and the Oregon Territory.

WARRE, Henry James (1819-1898).
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Book Description: [London:] Dickinson & Co., [1848.], 1848. Broadsheet (21 4/8 x 14 4/8 inches). Publisher's slip advertising binding options tipped-in to first text leaf (without the dedication leaf found in some copies). Lithographed map and 20 FINE tinted lithographed views after Warre on 16 sheets (wear with small losses in margins of text leaves and some guards, some of these with small, old repairs, plates with light wear and light spotting near blank edges, one plate with short marginal tears). Original cloth-backed printed paper wrappers (gutta percha perished leaving all leaves loose, front wrapper chipped and with repaired tear near spine, finger-sized loss to rear wrapper, some soiling). Provenance: with the ownership inscription of ?'S.R.G.' on the front wrapper. FIRST EDITION, IN THE ORIGINAL WRAPPERS, OF THIS MAGNIFICENT SERIES OF PACIFIC NORTHWEST VIEWS, including dramatic images of Puget Sound, Mount Hood, and multiple views of the Columbia River and of the Rocky Mountains, most peopled with small figures of Native Americans in the foreground. A few scenes, such as the view of Fort Vancouver, depicted on the same plate with the scene of an "Indian tomb" (a canoe about to be launched on its final voyage), delicately evoke the poignancy of colonization. These are some of the earliest and most beautiful lithographed views of the Rockies and Pacific Northwest. The Oregon country had been "jointly occupied by American and English settlers since 1818; by the 1840s both nations looked to annex the territory to gain an outlet to the Pacific. Spurred by the interests of the Hudson's Bay Company, the British viewed the Columbia River as the appropriate boundary between Canada and northwest America. Expansionists in the United States looked much further north and coined the latitudinal slogan "54º40' or Fight!" In 1845, in anticipation that war might break out in Oregon, Captain Henry James Warre was sent out of Montreal in secret to survey the region. As a British officer, Warre had been trained to sketch the landscape; during the arduous fourteen-month journey by canoe, boat, and horseback, he made more than eighty drawings. By 1846 the crisis was settled by the Oregon Treaty, which fixed the boundary at the 49th parallel. Warre then converted his sketches and notes into a magnificent color plate book, the most important one published on the subject of the Pacific Northwest" (Virginia Historical Society online). Abbey, Travel 656; Graff 4543; Howes W-114 ('the only western color-plates comparable in beauty to those by Bodmer'); Sabin 101455; Smith 10727; Wagner-Camp-Becker 157. Bookseller Inventory # 72lib898

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Book Description: [London]: Dickinson & Co., [1848]. Folio. (21 x 14 1/4 inches). Letterpress title (verso blank), pp.[1-]5 letterpress text Sketch of the Journey. 20 hand-coloured lithographed views on 16 sheets, by Dickinson and Co., after Warre, 1 lithographic map, hand-coloured in outline with routes marked in red and blue. Small format slip from the publisher giving details of the various bindings available. Publisher's linen-backed light brown paper wrappers, letterpress title repeated on the upper wrapper, rear wrapper blank. Housed in a modern dark blue cloth chemise and dark blue morocco backed box. First edition, original hand-coloured issue of a work which contains the "only western color plates comparable in beauty to those by Bodmer" (Howes). An important record of the American west before it was touched by western civilization. This copy in the original wrappers. Captain Warre and Lieutenant Mervin Vavasour, of the Royal Engineers, left Montreal on 5 May 1845. They initially accompanied Sir George Simpson, governor of the Hudson Bay Company, who was making a tour of inspection of the Company's outposts. On reaching Fort Garry (plate 1) at the confluence of the Red and Assiniboine Rivers, they teamed up with Peter Skene Ogden (1790-1854), a Company Chief Trader who had vast experience of the West, the Columbia and the Rockies in particular. Travelling mainly on horseback, the journey from the fort over the Rockies to Fort Colville took them from 16 June to 12 August. This section of the journey is illustrated by five plates. They left Fort Colville in boats and made their way down the Columbia River arriving at the Pacific on 25 August (3 plates). They then spent the winter exploring Oregon Territory and the Pacific Coast, visiting the Company settlement on the Willamette River (2 plates), exploring the Columbia River (1 plate), visiting Fort George on the Columbia River (2 plates), Vancouver Island and Fort Vancouver (1 plate), Cowelitz River and Puget's Sound. Once the weather started to improve, Warre and Vavasour and a party of about 30 began their westward journey on 25 March 1846, again by boat, but this time against the current. Warre made sketches of Mount Hood (2 plates) during this journey. They arrived at Fort Walla Walla, a distance of about 200 miles, on 3 April. They then took to horses again, and taking a short cut of about 250 miles, made for Fort Colville across a desert landscape (1 plate). From Fort Colville they went up the Columbia by boat for about 250 miles, setting off to cross the Rockies on foot. After seven days their food ran out, but, fortunately, a search party sent out from the Company station at Jasper's House found them and guided them to safety. The station was on the Atthabasca River, and from here they again took to boats and swiftly descended a distance of nearly 400 miles in two and half days to Fort Assinboine. On horseback, they travelled 100 miles in three days to Fort Edmonton on the Saskatchawan River. Then, by boat, 500 miles down the river to Fort Carlton. Again on horseback, they crossed the prairie to Red River in ten days, a distance of about 450 miles, arriving back at Fort Garry on 7 June. Here they met up with Sir George Simpson and together returned by boat to Montreal, arriving on 20 July 1846. The background to the journey was semi-official and semi-secret: Warre and Vavasour were to make what amounted to a military reconnaissance of the Oregon Territory. American expansionists were making it clear that the uneasy joint occupation of Oregon by the United States and Great Britain was not equitable and were demanding that a northernmost frontier be established. The two officers, with the enthusiastic support of the Hudson Bay Company, were sent to gather information that would be of use in the negotiations. As Howes notes, Warre's dramatic depiction of the scenery, situations and incidents he encountered has resulted in "the only western color plates comparable in beauty to those. Bookseller Inventory # 26754

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Book Description: [London]: Dickinson & Co., [1848]., 1848. Letterpress title (verso blank), pp.[1-]5 letterpress text, "Sketch of the Journey." Twenty handcolored lithographed views on 16 sheets, by Dickinson and Co., after Warre; lithographic map, handcolored in outline with routes marked in red and blue. Small format slip from the publisher giving details of the various bindings available. Publisher's linen-backed light brown paper wrappers, letterpress title repeated on the upper wrapper, rear wrapper blank. Very good. In a modern dark blue chemise and dark blue morocco backed box. First edition, original handcolored issue of a work which contains the "only western color plates comparable in beauty to those by Bodmer" (Howes). An important record of the American west before it was touched by western civilization. Captain Warre and Lieut. Mervin Vavasour, of the Royal Engineers, left Montreal on May 5, 1845. They initially accompanied Sir George Simpson, governor of the Hudson's Bay Company, who was making a tour of inspection of the Company's outposts. On reaching Fort Garry (plate 1) at the confluence of the Red and Assiniboine Rivers, they teamed up with Peter Skene Ogden (1790-1854), a Company Chief Trader who had vast experience of the West, the Columbia and the Rockies in particular. Travelling mainly on horseback, the journey from the fort over the Rockies to Fort Colville took them from June 16 to August 12. This section of the journey is illustrated by five plates. They left Fort Colville in boats and made their way down the Columbia River, arriving at the Pacific on August 25 (3 plates). They then spent the winter exploring Oregon Territory and the Pacific Coast, visiting the Company settlement on the Willamette River (2 plates), exploring the Columbia River (1 plate), visiting Fort George on the Columbia River (2 plates), Vancouver Island and Fort Vancouver (1 plate), Cowelitz River, and Puget's Sound. Once the weather started to improve, Warre and Vavasour and a party of about thirty began their westward journey on March 25, 1846, again by boat, but this time against the current. Warre made sketches of Mount Hood (2 plates) during this journey. They arrived at Fort Walla Walla, a distance of about 200 miles, on April 3. They then took to horses again, and taking a short cut of about 250 miles, made for Fort Colville across a desert landscape (1 plate). From Fort Colville they went up the Columbia by boat for about 250 miles, setting off to cross the Rockies on foot. After seven days their food ran out, but fortunately a search party sent out from the Company station at Jasper's House found them and guided them to safety. The station was on the Athabasca River, and from there they again took to boats and swiftly descended a distance of nearly 400 miles in two and half days to Fort Assiniboine. On horseback, they travelled 100 miles in three days to Fort Edmonton on the Saskatchewan River. Then, by boat, five hundred miles down the river to Fort Carlton. Again on horseback, they crossed the prairie to Red River in ten days, a distance of about 450 miles, arriving back at Fort Garry on June 7. There they met up with Sir George Simpson and together returned by boat to Montreal, arriving on July 20, 1846. The background to the journey was semi-official and semi- secret: Warre and Vavasour were to make what amounted to a military reconnaissance of Oregon Territory. American expansionists were making it clear that the uneasy joint occupation of Oregon by the United States and Great Britain was not equitable and were demanding that a northernmost frontier be established. The two officers, with the enthusiastic support of the Hudson's Bay Company, were sent to gather information that would be of use in the negotiations. As Howes notes, Warre's dramatic depiction of the scenery, situations and incidents he encountered has resulted in "the only western color plates comparable in beauty to those by Bodmer." This copy without the dedication to the Hudson's Bay Company executives, whi. Bookseller Inventory # WRCAM 46617

8.

Scene on the Upper Guayaquil River

Norton Bush (1834-1894)
(San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.)
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Book Description: No Binding. Book Condition: Very Good. Norton Bush (1834-1894) Scene on the Upper Guayaquil River Signed, dated 1880 at lower right Inscribed with title on stretcher Oil on canvas 20” x 36,” 30” x 46” framed Provenance: Private Collection, San Francisco, CA Born in Rochester, New York, in 1834, Norton Bush first studied art in his native town as the pupil of James Harris, an established landscape painter. In 1850, Bush moved to New York and studied with the Hudson River School painter Jasper Cropsey (1823-1900). At the suggestion of the artist Frederic Church (1826-1900), Bush decided to travel to look for inspiration for his paintings. In 1853, Bush left New York for San Francisco by boat, crossing America through Nicaragua on the old “Vanderbuilt” route used by many Gold Rush prospectors and poineers, as the transcontinental railroad would not be complete until 1869. Bush settled in San Francisco and became part of the growing art community in the city in the 1860s. After a sketching tour to Central America in 1868, Bush increasingly turned to tropical subjects, which were very popular in San Francisco. A majority of San Francisco residents before 1869 had experienced a taste of the tropics in their pioneer journey to California, and Bush’s transcriptions of the lush beauty of the region evoked nostalgic memories. Additionally, many Hudson River school painters, such as Frederic Church, had started to travel and paint scenes from South America and other tropical areas. Norton Bush became the most popular, and best known nationally, of the artists who settled in California and specialized in landscapes of the tropics. Bush’s favorite subject was the tropical lagoon framed by palm trees. He was a master at capturing the soft harmonies of sunset in the tropics and their reflections in still water. Describing Bush’s tropical scenes, a San Francisco Evening Post art critic wrote: Not only is the vegetation splendidly tinted, but the atmosphere is warm, soft and golden, and the water as perfectly represented as can be imagined Mr. Bush occupies a leading position as an American artist and the newspapers of New York and other Eastern cities have often referred to his paintings in terms of a warm eulogy. (October 27, 1874) In 1875 Bush traveled to South America on a commission from Henry Meiggs, a mining and railroad entrepreneur whom had moved there from San Francisco. Bush visited Peru, Chile and Ecuador, taking studies for works like this tranquil scene that depicts the Guayaquil River in Ecuador. In 1878 Bush became director of the San Francisco Art Association, and in the following years won four gold medals at California State Fair exhibitions for his paintings of the tropics. In later years, Bush took to painting marine scenes, which lacked the popularity of his tropical views. In 1893, Bush was put in charge of the California section of the Columbian Exposition in Chicago. The strenuous efforts of this were too much for his health, and he died in Oakland in April, 1894. Works by Norton Bush can be found in the collections of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Oakland Museum of California. Signed by Illustrator(s). Bookseller Inventory # H00201c

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Book Description: [At sea]: Printed by J.L. Hall on board the Henry Lee, ., 1849. 88pp., with pp.9-20 provided in facsimile. The gathering containing pp.41- 44 is included twice herein. Small octavo. Gathered signatures. Several text leaves with expert tissue repairs at the extremities, but not affecting any text. Pencil corrections, notes, and emendations in the author's hand. A very good copy. In a cloth chemise and half morocco and cloth slipcase, spine gilt. With the bookplate of Mary Young Moore (nee Mary C. Young) on the pastedown of the chemise. An amazing rarity of Western Americana and the gold rush, printed by Linville Hall on board the Henry Lee as it made the voyage around the Horn and to the California gold fields in the spring and summer of 1849. It is the first sea journal of the '49 California Argonauts to be published, and the first printed narrative of a gold seeker, and recounts the voyage in quite vivid style. This copy appears to have been Linville Hall's own copy, and contains pencil manuscript corrections in his hand on forty- three pages, reflecting changes between the text in this 1849 edition and the 1898 second edition, which was also printed by Hall. "It is not only a very interesting account of the organization and voyage of a company that sailed to California in its own ship, but it is one of the first books printed in part at San Francisco" - Streeter sale. "The first printed narrative of a California gold-seeker and the best record of an argonaut expedition by sea" - Howes. "Ranks as one of the most celebrated and interesting of all Gold Rush narratives" - Kurutz. This copy was sold to Mary Young Moore by the Hudson Book Company (later Edward Eberstadt & Sons) in 1924, which commissioned the facsimile copies of pages 9 to 20 from the copy at the Bancroft Library. In a typed note included here, they assert that this was Linville Hall's copy, acquired from his descendants. Warren Howell, in the catalogue description of this copy in JOHN HOWELL - BOOKS ANNIVERSARY CATALOGUE of 1982, casts doubt on the likelihood of this, and his assertions have been joined by those of other booksellers. We believe, however, based on internal evidence, that this was in fact Linville Hall's own copy, used by him in creating the second edition of the book in the 1890s. It seems fairly clear that the numerous pencil notes in the text do not simply reflect a later owner's attempts to make this text conform to that of the 1898 edition. Rather, the marks (on forty- three of this copy's seventy-six original text pages) seem to clearly be editorial in nature, changing punctuation and offering suggestions for additional text that did or did not make it into the 1898 edition. For example, a paragraph on page 22 of this copy has a long pencil mark beside it; in the second edition the text of this paragraph has been expanded to comprise three paragraphs. On page 49 of this copy, the phrase "which is especially uppermost" appears in pencil in the margin - it appears in print in the text in the appropriate place in the 1898 edition. Similar occurrences are found on pages 52, 53, and 63, as well as several other places. In a number of instances on pages 58 and 59, editorial markings appear (e.g. crossing out dashes in favor of semicolons in the 1898 edition), which it seems clear would be made by someone preparing a new edition, but beyond the efforts or interests of an assiduous later owner of this copy seeking to rectify the text with the 1898 edition. In other places words, notes, or marks are penciled in which do not appear in the 1898 edition. For example, on page 84 of our copy, the words "insert here" appear in pencil in the margin, yet no additional text is present in the 1898 edition. Again, it would seem that this is the work of a revising editor - Linville Hall himself - rather than that of a later owner. Someone, in other words, who was making notes for a revised edition, and then used some but not all of his penciled notes in the later edition when he actually printed it. Linville J. Hall, identifi. Bookseller Inventory # WRCAM 36410

Book Description: [Farmington, Connecticut, 1841], 1841. Elijah Porter's journal of his American Revolutionary War service covers a three-year period, May 1777 to May 1780, and is so arranged as to provide a vivid narrative of the leading incidents and campaigns during his military service in New York and New Jersey. It is a narrative more than a mere daily accounting. Porter served in General Israel Putnam's Division of the Connecticut Line, under General George Washington's command. The main events chronicled by Porter include the Battles of Fort Montgomery, Monmouth, and Stony Point. He describes the capture and execution of two spies, an attempt to kidnap Washington, the arrest of American General Charles Lee by Washington in the field at Monmouth, an African American servant's single-handed capture of a British officer, and Washington's tearful solicitude for his troops during the harsh winter encampment at Morristown. Some of the other persons discussed by Porter include American General Anthony Wayne, the "Hored Trayter [Benedict] Arnold," and American ally, "Barren Stuben [Baron von Steuben] the Old Prussian Drummer." Porter, of Farmington, Connecticut, enlisted in May 1777 and first served in the Hudson River Valley in New York. The journal of his three years' military service in the American Revolution begins with accounts of two separate incidents there concerning the arrests, trials, and executions of two British spies in September and October of 1777. Porter begins by providing a gripping description of his having to hold down a distraught kneeling British officer convicted of espionage so that the officer could be shot to death. He has to leap away as the officer is shot. A description of the dramatic discovery and subsequent hanging of another spy near Fishkill, New York follows: "[O]ur patrolling party discovered a man making towards the [British] Fleet, they took him up and brought him before a Court & one of the guards testified he saw a stranger put something in his mouth whereupon the surgeon gave him an emetic which brought up a silver ball and in it a letter from Burgoine [British General John Burgoyne] to Genl. [Sir Henry] Clinton to hasten on for his relief, the Court passed the sentence of Death and in an hour he was swinging under the Gallows" (pp. [2-3]). Porter also writes about the British plan to capture George Washington across the river from West Point. A servant girl in a house where Washington was attending a ball detected the plot to kidnap General Washington and take him to New York. The servant warned Washington's guard who: "-place[ed] themselves in the bottom of the Boat and kept still, the night was dark, but the sentry soon discovered a boat approaching but they kept still untill the enemy landed, they then arose and sprang ashore and captured all the enemy and brought them with Genl. Washington over to West Point in safety[.] not long after this the report was that the British Army at Philadelphia under Genl. Howe was on their way to N. York & Genl Washington was making all the preparation he could to capture the whole army" (pp. [8-9]). The most moving account within Porter's Journal of a Revolutionary Soldier is of the hardships endured by Washington's army during their harsh winter encampment at Morristown, New Jersey in 1779 and 1780. Porter's description of a sleepless Washington wading through the snow, tearfully comforting his hungry troops is particularly affecting: "[O]n the 5th day very early in the morning, before sun rising, there was some noise in the Camp and behold Genl. Washington wading in the snow, leading his horse and calling at every Hutt speaking kindly to all the soldiers and saying the first he knew of their sufferings, was the night before and had not slept a moment during the night, but tho it was severe cold was on his way to see and sympathise with the suffering Soldiers, and when he found them so puicible [peaceable?] & so rejoiced to see him & hear his voice, he was much overcome & the Tears rolled down his chee. Bookseller Inventory # 255922

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Book Description: Soft cover. Book Condition: Very Good. Antwerpen, Francoys van Duynen, 1649. 24 leaves, small 4to. No wrappers, later paper spine. Two round stains at the bottom of title and first text leaf, else a very good copy. The pamphlet comes in a fine recent marbled board folding case. **** This is the first separate publication on New Netherland. In 1649, delegates were sent from New Netherland to Holland to express grievances against the government about the treatment of the colonists. The anonymously published pamphlet "Breeden Raedt" brought these grievances to the public. It is composed as a dialogue between several fictional persons and strongly attacks the administrations of Directors William Kieft and Peter Stuyvesant. The chief speaker is a Dutch "Schipper", who had been in New Netherland. It is very evident, however, that the real narrator was not a mere skipper of a merchant vessel. He was intimately acquainted with the details of local politics of New Netherland and evidently personally unfriendly both to Kieft and Stuyvesant. For a long time, scholars therefore agreed that the pamphlet must have been written by Cornelis Melyn,who was born in Antwerp and played an important role in the early rise of the colony. He was imprisoned and banned by Stuyvesant. **** The roughly-translated title "Broad Advice" is taken from the naval term used to advise in case of danger or emergency. The pamphlet introduces a total of ten voices: a Portuguese soldier in the service of the Company, the captain of a ship, a Swedish student, a Spanish barber, a French merchant, a Neapolitan, a German gentleman, a poor English nobleman, a boatswain and Polander. With these men as spokesmen, the agents and officers of the Dutch West India Company in Brazil and New Netherland are arraigned, and harshest criticism is reserved for Kieft and Stuyvesant. The tone is coarse and critical. The text is often very graphic in its depiction of violence in the colony, with details of kidnappings and murders, massacres and torture. The work details Kieft's brutal treatment of the local Indians and the Pavonia and Corlears Hook massacres. "Equally unflattering accounts are given of his successor, Stuyvesant, mentioning the incident of losing his leg at the siege of St. Martin in the West Indies, and giving instances of his arrogant and intransigent behavior as governor" (Lathrop Harper, cat. 201, item 415). Important references to Dutch interests in Brazil are included. **** Asher, In his "Bibliographical and historical essay on the Dutch books and Pamphlets relating to New Netherland" entirely devotes pp. 183-198(!) to this pamphlet, which he claims to have discovered (or at least, discovered its historical importance) in 1849. An English translation was made for the first time by F.W. Cowan and included in Müller's "Catalogue of books relating to America" (Amsterdam, 1850). In 1854, Henry C. Murphy published a full translation of the pamphlet (Vertoogh van Nieu Nederland and Breeden Raedt, New York, privately printed). Asher argued that Melyn could not have been the work's author. The title-page ascribes authorship to "I.A." followed by the initials "G.W.C." "The only person prominent enough in New Amsterdam and whose name fits the initials, was Isaac Allerton, one of the Eight Men, but it seems inconceivable that he had anything to do with the composition of the tract. The initials 'G.W.C.' may well mean Geoctroyeerde West-Indische Compagnie, and are probably added to make it appear that the tract was composed by someone officially connected with the West India Company" (Stokes). Until today, there are no definitive clues to prove authorship of the pamphlet.**** EXCEEDINGLY RARE. Last copy sold in auction: 1967, Streeter sale. Müller priced his copy at the then enormous sum of $250 in 1850. Henry C. Murphy, who made a new translation for James Lenox (published in 1854), sold his copy at auction in 1884 for $100. AldenL 649/32; Asher 334; Bell B485; JCB (3) II:382; Sabin 26272; Stokes IconVI:259. Bookseller Inventory # 123985

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Book Description: London: T. Cadell and W. Davies, 1801. Hardcover. Book Condition: Fine. 1st Edition. 4to. 1pp (half-title) + 1pp (title leaf) + viii (Preface) + cxxxii (A General History of the Fur Trade) + 412pp + 2pp (errata). Engraved frontispiece portrait, 3 large folding engraved maps (1 with hand-coloured details). Presentation copy: Inscribed on the half-title by Mackenzie to "The Right Honorable Henry Addington Chancellor of the Exchequer &c &c &c &c &c from the Author." Publisher's blue paper-covered boards, recent paper spine in period style, with titles in black. Housed in a full speckled calf slipcase, elaborately gilt-decorated spine and panelled sides, red and black morocco labels. Old stains in the lower blank margin of a dozen leaves, with some scattered light offsetting and toning, one map moderately spotted. Map tabs neatly reinforced. Untrimmed and wide-margined. Alexander Mackenzie (1764-1820), a fur trader and senior wintering partner with the North West Company, focused his exploration on finding a passage from the northwest fur-bearing regions of the Athabasca country overland to the Pacific Ocean. Following the speculation of Peter Pond that the Pacific Ocean might be reached by a water route from Great Slave Lake, his first expedition from Fort Chipewyan in 1789 took him not to the Pacific as he had hoped, but down the river (that would become the Mackenzie River) to the "Frozen" or Arctic Ocean. In his second attempt, he ascended the Peace River by canoe and on foot, and crossed over into the headwaters of what he thought was the Columbia River (but was actually the Fraser River). After being turned back by its unmanageable and torrential currents, he and his party decided to make an overland attempt to reach the Pacific Ocean. In this they were successful, and arrived near the present site of Bella Coola, on the British Columbia coast. Mackenzie had accomplished his goal of reaching the Pacific, and in doing so had also distinguished himself as being the first white man to cross the American continent north of Mexico. Provenance: Henry Addington, 1st Viscount Sidmouth (1757-1844) was first elected to the House of Commons in 1784, and by 1789 had risen to the position of Speaker of the House. After the resignation of Prime Minister William Pitt the Younger in March 1801, Addington was chosen as his successor, and became Prime Minister and Chancellor of the Exchequer. His most notable achievement came with his negotiation of the Treaty of Amiens in 1802, in which peace with France was attained. Unfortunately, the treaty was short-lived (not unlike the many other treaties with France), and peace quickly broke down. He remained Prime Minister and Chancellor of the Exchequer until May 1804, when William Pitt the Younger returned to power. Mackenzie must have presented this book to Addington some time between December 1801 (the time of release) and the spring of 1802, when he returned to Montreal to resume his involvement in the Canadian fur trade. It is not known whether Mackenzie had a close association with Addington, but they undoubtedly discussed Mackenzie's desire for some level of cooperation between the Hudson's Bay Company and the North West Company, and possibly the East India Company. Mackenzie outlined his proposal for commercial cooperation in the final pages of his book, and presented the details of his plan to Addington's Secretary of State for War and the Colonies, Lord Hobert (Robert Hobart, 4th Earl of Buckinghamshire) in January of 1802, most certainly with the participation of Addington. It may have been during their meeting that the book was presented to Addington in the hopes that he would seriously consider and support Mackenzie's plan to unite the warring fur trade factions. As is typical of Mackenzie's rare presentation inscriptions, he has written the dedication in a large neat hand on the half-title, simply signed "from the Author" according to the etiquette of the day. [Peel 3: 55; Strathern 34; Streeter 3653; TPL 658]. Inscribed by Author(s). Bookseller Inventory # v1427

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Book Description: London: Printed for J. Robinson, 1749. Hardcover. Book Condition: Fine. No Jacket. 1st Edition. ". from the observations made on board the ships sent upon the late discovery ; supported by affidavits, which coincides with several former accounts : humbly offered to the consideration of Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament." First edition. 8vo., 23 pp., 3/4 polished mottled calf and cloth in the old style. Dobbs' theory on the location of the Northwest Passage, with affidavits of Henry Ellis and Jeremiah Westall on conditions around Hudson Bay. If not authored directly by Dobbs, the pamphlet at least closely allies itself with Dobbs' position. A very fine copy, of a very rare book. See Christie's sale #1820, 16 - 17 April 2007 The Frank S. Streeter Library. References: Alden & Landis 749/226; JCB (3) III:904; Sabin 68291; Staton & Tremaine/TPL 216; Streeter sale VI:3643. Bookseller Inventory # t-55

14.

Novus Orbis, seu descriptionis Indiae occidentalis.

LAET, Johannes de (1593-1649).
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Book Description: Leiden: Elzevir, 1633., 1633. Folio (12 6/8 x 8 4/8 inches). Half-title, engraved architectural title-page, 14 engraved double-page maps by Hessel Gerritsz (browned), numerous woodcut illustrations of plants, animals and inhabitants of the New World in text. Contemporary vellum, yapp fore-edges, title written in manuscript on the spine. First Edition in Latin, first published as "Nieuwe Wereldt ofte Beschrijvinghe van West-Indien" in Leiden in 1625. Dedicated to Charles II. "One of the most famous contemporary descriptions of the natural history of the New World. The work was highly praised a century later by Charlevoix, attesting to its accuracy. Winsor referred to Laet's book as the standard seventeenth-century work on New Netherland" (Streeter sale I:37). This edition includes four regional American maps first published in the enlarged second edition of 1630. The map of "Nova Anglia" is of "extreme importance being the first printed one to use the names "Manbattes" (Manhattan), and "N. Amsterdam", or New York, founded in 1626. It is also the earliest to use the Dutch names of "Noordt Rivier" and "Zuyd Rivier", for the Hudson and Delaware Rivers respectively, as well as the Indian "Massachusetts", for the new English colony" (Burden). Many of the maps served as prototypes for later Dutch maps of the region; The translation from the Dutch was probably by Laet himself. De Laet was born in Antwerp but in 1585, the family, like thousands of Flemish protestants, fled to the northern Netherlands. After studying philosophy in Leiden the young de Laet traveled to London in 1603, obtained his denizenship, but after the death of his wife returned to Leiden, where in April 1608 he "married Maria Boudewijns van Berlicum (d. 1643). There he made a fortune through overseas trade and land investments, at home and at Laetburg, near Albany, in New Netherland. In 1619 he was appointed a director of the Dutch West Indies Company, a position he held until his death. "In the ongoing religious quarrels which troubled Holland, de Laet sided with the counter-remonstrants (Gomarists) against the remonstrants (Arminians), an allegiance evident in his 'Commentarii de Pelagianis et Semi-Pelagianis' (1617). In 1618 he was delegated for Leiden to the Synod of Dort, where he befriended the theologian Samuel Ward, master of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, one of the several English delegates. In his leisure time he proved a prolific, many-sided scholar with a keen interest in theology, geography, botany, classical philology, and comparative historical linguistics. Still of importance are his lavishly illustrated books on the Americas—'Nieuwe wereldt' (1625), which he also translated into Latin (1633) and French (1640) [as here], a detailed account of the early years of the 'Dutch West Indies Company' (1644), and 'Historia naturalis Brasiliae' (1648). He contributed eleven volumes to the Elzevier 'Respublicae' series, including ones on Scotland and Ireland (1627), England (1630), and India (1631). In a magisterial polemic with Hugo Grotius, he disproved Grotius's claims that the Native Americans originated from China, Ethiopia, and Norway (1644). His de luxe edition of Vitruvius's 'De architectura' (1649) includes his Latin translation of Sir Henry Wotton's 'The Elements of Architecture' (1624). De Laet was an astute Anglo-Saxonist, corresponding and co-operating with (but also envied by) such antiquaries as William Camden, Sir Henry Spelman, Sir John Spelman, Abraham Wheelock, Sir Simonds D'Ewes, John Selden, and Patrick Young. Archbishop James Ussher lent him the famous ‘Caedmon’ manuscript (Bodl. Oxf., MS Junius 11) for an Old English–Latin dictionary he was compiling. His correspondence with John Morris reflects contemporary Anglo-Dutch intellectual exchange, while his unpublished epistolary exchange with Sir William Boswell (d. 1649), English ambassador in The Hague, is a particularly rich quarry for evidence of political and economic interchange between England and Holland. "In. Bookseller Inventory # 002121

15.

A New Map of New England, New York, New Iarsey.

THORNTON, MORDEN, AND LEA
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Book Description: 1685. No binding. Book Condition: Fine. A New Map of New England, New York, New Iarsey, Pensilvania, Maryland and Virginia. By Philip Lea at the Atlas and Hercules in Cheap-side, London [c. 1685]. Third state. 21 1/4 x 17 3/4 in. Historical BackgroundA highly important map of the English Colonies in North America, including the earliest printed plan of New York Harbor. The present example is the third state of the map, bearing the imprint "By Philip Lea at the Atlas and Hercules in Cheap-side" in place of Thornton, Morden, and Lee's imprint, a distinguishing feature of the second state. No examples of the first state, lacking the New York inset, survive. Two later states also appeared. Thornton, Morden, and Lea's map is the first obtainable state of the finest general map of England's American colonies. It is also one of the earliest to include Augustine Herrman's cartography for Virginia and Maryland, as well as one of the earliest depictions of the Pennsylvania colony (est. 1681), the first printed chart of New York Harbor, and significant additions to the cartography of New England.According to Pritchard and Taliaferro, the map was issued as part of a 4-sheet wall map, but its publishers, three of London's leading map publishers, limited their fiscal risk by placing all English colonies except Carolina on one sheet and giving it a separate title that would be trimmed off or pasted over when the sheet was used as part of the wall map. The map shows the English colonies from Cape Ann in Massachusetts to Cape Henry at the mouth of Chesapeake Bay, extends as far north as the tributaries of the Hudson, in the southwest it shows the Delaware and Susquehannah Rivers and as far west as the tributaries of the Potomac and Rappahannock.The geography of Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania and New Jersey are derived from the Thornton-Greene Mapp of Virginia Mary=land, New Jarsey, New=York, & New England (ca. 1678), which is, in turn, based largely on Augustine Herrman's Virginia and Maryland (1673).The Thornton, Morden, and Lea map departs from its precursors by showing the new colony of Pennsylvania, adjusting the course of the Delaware River, and adding place names. In New York and New England, Thornton, Morden, and Lea rely on earlier examples, notably John Seller's Mapp of New England (1676) but add Long Island's barrier beaches as well as numerous place names along the Connecticut coast and on Cape Cod. Also, the boundaries between Massachusetts, Plymouth and Connecticut colonies are drawn, and several roads are shown.The inset of New York Harbor is also significant as the first separate printed chart of the area. Based on a 1683 survey conducted by Philip Wells for William Penn and the other proprietors of West New Jersey, the New York Harbor chart is far more accurate than earlier work, clearly showing the shoals that limited shipping to a single deep-water channel around Sandy Hook and into harbor. ReferencesAugustyn & Cohen, Manhattan in Maps, pp. 48-49; Burden, Mapping of North America, #616; Cumming, British Maps of Colonial America, p. 31, fig. 18 (detail); McCorkle, New England in Early Printed Maps, entries 680.4 and 685.3; Pritchard & Taliaferro, Degrees of Latitude, pp. 362-363.ConditionCenterfold and right edge with expert paper restoration intermittently along their entire length. The map laid down on linen. Some darkening along fold in lower right quadrant, old stain at right side, and some bleed-through from ink inscription on verso. Map. Bookseller Inventory # 22134

16.

Beschrijvinghe van West-Indien door Ionnes de Laet. Tweede druck.

LAET, Johannes de (1593-1649).
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Book Description: Leiden: Elzevier, 1630., 1630. Folio (12 ¼ x 7 ¾ inches). Engraved title-page (lower edge frayed), 14 folding maps (lightly browned, some staining and one or two short marginal tears affecting the image of "Straet van Magallanes" (lacking half-title). Contemporary vellum over paste-board, yapp fore edges, gilt-lettered green paper label on the spine (label chipped, generally a bit soiled, one or two worm holes, extremities rubbed, endpapers renewed). Provenance: occasional contemporary underscoring. "IT IS ARGUABLY THE FINEST [ATLAS] PUBLISHED IN THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY" (Burden) Second, expanded edition of one of the most important of seventeenth-century New World voyages collections, compiled by a director of the recently formed Dutch West India Company, Johannes de Laet (1581-1649). Including for the first time four American regional maps: "Americae sive Indiae Occidentalis", the best West Coast delineation to date, and interestingly depicting California as a peninsula not an island, and stopping short of the controversial region of the North West Passage; "Nova Francia et Regiones Adiacentes", one of the foundation maps of Canada, the first printed map to include an accurate depiction of Prince Edward Island, and the earliest of a north-south oriented Lake Champlain, and still relied upon by Blaeu in 1662 and Coronelli in the 1690s; "Nova Anglia" is of "extreme importance being the first printed one to use the names "Manbattes" (Manhattan), and "N. Amsterdam", or New York, founded in 1626. It is also the earliest to use the Dutch names of "Noordt Rivier" and "Zuyd Rivier", for the Hudson and Delaware Rivers respectively, as well as the Indian "Massachusetts", for the new English colony" (Burden); and "Florida, et regions vicinae" a largely derivative map with one notable alteration in the "placing of "C.Francois" further east into the Atlantic Ocean. Florida, as we know it today, is here called "Tegesta Provinc." This name, applied here for the first time, is that of a tribe of Indians living on the south-west coast. "Florida" was at this time applied to a far larger region" (Burden). De Laet was born in Antwerp but in 1585, the family, like thousands of Flemish protestants, fled to the northern Netherlands. After studying philosophy in Leiden the young de Laet traveled to London in 1603, obtained his denizenship, but after the death of his wife returned to Leiden, where in April 1608 he "married Maria Boudewijns van Berlicum (d. 1643). There he made a fortune through overseas trade and land investments, at home and at Laetburg, near Albany, in New Netherland. In 1619 he was appointed a director of the Dutch West Indies Company, a position he held until his death. "In the ongoing religious quarrels which troubled Holland, de Laet sided with the counter-remonstrants (Gomarists) against the remonstrants (Arminians), an allegiance evident in his 'Commentarii de Pelagianis et Semi-Pelagianis' (1617). In 1618 he was delegated for Leiden to the Synod of Dort, where he befriended the theologian Samuel Ward, master of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, one of the several English delegates. In his leisure time he proved a prolific, many-sided scholar with a keen interest in theology, geography, botany, classical philology, and comparative historical linguistics. Still of importance are his lavishly illustrated books on the Americas—'Nieuwe wereldt' (1625), which he also translated into Latin (1633) and French (1640) [as here], a detailed account of the early years of the 'Dutch West Indies Company' (1644), and 'Historia naturalis Brasiliae' (1648). He contributed eleven volumes to the Elzevier 'Respublicae' series, including ones on Scotland and Ireland (1627), England (1630), and India (1631). In a magisterial polemic with Hugo Grotius, he disproved Grotius's claims that the Native Americans originated from China, Ethiopia, and Norway (1644). His de luxe edition of Vitruvius's 'De architectura' (1649) includes his Latin translation of Sir Henry Wotton's 'The Ele. Bookseller Inventory # 002122

Book Description: Gorhamburie [Hertfordshire], 3 August 1619., 1619. 1 page, folio, with integral address leaf (seal tear repaired, trace of seal, endorsement ‘R[eceived] 6 August’), old foliation at head, trace of former hinge; the main text written by a clerk in a clear secretary hand with names and valediction in italic; in fine, fresh condition. As Lord Chancellor Bacon presided over the Star Chamber, while as Attorney General Yelverton was responsible for prosecuting cases pro Rege before the Court. The ‘busines against the Dutchmen’ was a celebrated case with more than forty defendants, London merchants and foreigners, who had been charged with subversion of the realm by exporting gold and silver coins, bullion, plate, and other treasure in violation of statutes that went back to the fourteenth century and of the King’s proclamation of 23 November 1611. This was a serious matter in the troubled economic climate of 1619, and probably explains why the Attorney General was prepared to ride roughshod over ‘the auncient priviledges & customes’ of the Cinque Ports where he did not have the jurisdiction to issue subpoenas.As usual the records of Star Chamber do not show the outcome, the Decree and Order Books having been lost. Working from Exchequer records, however, Thomas G. Barnes was able to determine that ‘twenty alien merchants (though no Englishmen) were fined in sums from £1500 to £20,000 for a total of £151,500 – the largest amount of fines ever imposed in a single case’ (Barnes, p.302).The National Archives, STAC 8/25/19 (and later related cases STAC 8/25/20-23); William Hudson, ‘A Treatise of Star Chamber’, Collectanea juridica, II (1792), 1240; Thomas G. Barnes, ‘Mr Hudson’s Star Chamber’, Tudor Rule and Revolution: Essays for G. R. Elton from his American Friends (Cambridge, 1982), pp. 285-308, especially pp. 302-3. Bookseller Inventory # E1607

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Book Description: [Florence: 1646 or later]., 1646. Two sheets, joined (19 2/8 x 30 inches to the neat line, full margins showing the plate mark), matted. Fine engraved map showing the coasts of India and Sumatra, with fine cursive lettering, the title in an elaborate cartouche of fish, decorated with a compass rose and two-masted ship. Exceptionally fine engraved map from "Dell'arcano del mare", THE FIRST ENGLISH NAUTICAL ATLAS AND THE FIRST MARITIME ATLAS TO USE THE MERCATOR PROJECTION. Robert Dudley's "Secrets of the Sea" is "ONE OF THE GREATEST ATLASES OF THE WORLD and one of the most complex ever produced: it is the first sea-atlas of the whole world; the first with all the charts constructed using Mercator's new projection, as corrected by Edward Wright; the first to give magnetic declination; the first to give prevailing winds and currents. the first to expound the advantages of "Great Circle Sailing"; and . the first sea-atlas to be compiled by an Englishman." (Lord Wardington). Dudley's monumental work was the only exception to the total dominance of sea-atlas production by the Dutch for nearly a century. The complete work contained nearly 150 sea charts as well as dozens of illustrations and working diagrams. It was superior to any previous work in that the charts illustrated the whole world, the first time any outside of Europe had been included. His atlas was also the first to importantly show the prevailing winds, currents and magnetic deviation. In using the projection developed by Mercator, Dudley improved upon the theory of navigating by the "Great Circle," the shortest distance between two points on a globe. It was not until the eighteenth century that cartographers used the projection consistently, and during the prolonged period when the Dutch dominated cartographic production, not one atlas was published using it. This magnificently engraved work is an encyclopedia of seventeenth-century knowledge regarding the seas. Dudley was one of the more colorful and adventurous characters in the history of mapmaking. The illegitimate son of the Earl of Leicester and Lady Douglas Sheffield, but unable to establish his claim to the title of Earl of Leicester, Dudley left England in 1605. Arriving in Florence, Dudley entered the service of the Cosimo II, Grand Duke of Tuscany, as an engineer and naval commander. In 1646, Dudley published "Arcano del mare", the whole written in Italian by Dudley himself. The atlas was twelve years in the making, and the main innovation lay in its conception of a world atlas of charts, both general ocean charts and detailed surveys, covering all the rival spheres of European dominion: Spanish, English and Dutch. Dudley's sources included the original charts of Henry Hudson, and for the Pacific coast he used the observations of Henry Cavendish, the third circumnavigator of the globe and Dudley's brother-in-law. Bookseller Inventory # 72map20

19.
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Book Description: [Florence, 1648, or later]., 1648. Two sheets joined (19 2/8 x 29 4/8 inches to the neat line, full margins showing the plate mark), matted. Fine engraved map showing the coasts of the south-eastern part of the Arabian peninsula, north of Dhofar, the first including the southern part of the Red Sea, the second extending round to India, just north of Goa, with fine cursive lettering, the title in an elaborate cartouche of a shell, decorated with a compass rose and two-masted ship. Exceptionally fine engraved map from "Dell'arcano del mare", THE FIRST ENGLISH NAUTICAL ATLAS AND THE FIRST MARITIME ATLAS TO USE THE MERCATOR PROJECTION. Robert Dudley's "Secrets of the Sea" is "ONE OF THE GREATEST ATLASES OF THE WORLD and one of the most complex ever produced: it is the first sea-atlas of the whole world; the first with all the charts constructed using Mercator's new projection, as corrected by Edward Wright; the first to give magnetic declination; the first to give prevailing winds and currents. the first to expound the advantages of "Great Circle Sailing"; and . the first sea-atlas to be compiled by an Englishman." (Lord Wardington). Dudley's monumental work was the only exception to the total dominance of sea-atlas production by the Dutch for nearly a century. The complete work contained nearly 150 sea charts as well as dozens of illustrations and working diagrams. It was superior to any previous work in that the charts illustrated the whole world, the first time any outside of Europe had been included. His atlas was also the first to importantly show the prevailing winds, currents and magnetic deviation. In using the projection developed by Mercator, Dudley improved upon the theory of navigating by the "Great Circle," the shortest distance between two points on a globe. It was not until the eighteenth century that cartographers used the projection consistently, and during the prolonged period when the Dutch dominated cartographic production, not one atlas was published using it. This magnificently engraved work is an encyclopedia of seventeenth-century knowledge regarding the seas. Dudley was one of the more colorful and adventurous characters in the history of mapmaking. The illegitimate son of the Earl of Leicester and Lady Douglas Sheffield, but unable to establish his claim to the title of Earl of Leicester, Dudley left England in 1605. Arriving in Florence, Dudley entered the service of the Cosimo II, Grand Duke of Tuscany, as an engineer and naval commander. In 1646, Dudley published "Arcano del mare", the whole written in Italian by Dudley himself. The atlas was twelve years in the making, and the main innovation lay in its conception of a world atlas of charts, both general ocean charts and detailed surveys, covering all the rival spheres of European dominion: Spanish, English and Dutch. Dudley's sources included the original charts of Henry Hudson, and for the Pacific coast he used the observations of Henry Cavendish, the third circumnavigator of the globe and Dudley's brother-in-law. Bookseller Inventory # 72map21

20.
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Book Description: [Florence, 1648, or later]., 1648. Two sheets joined (19 2/8 x 29 4/8 inches to the neat line, full margins showing the plate mark), matted. Fine engraved map showing the coasts of the south-eastern part of the Arabian peninsula, north of Dhofar, the first including the southern part of the Red Sea, the second extending round to India, just north of Goa, with fine cursive lettering, the title in an elaborate cartouche of a shell, decorated with a compass rose and two-masted ship. Exceptionally fine engraved map from "Dell'arcano del mare", THE FIRST ENGLISH NAUTICAL ATLAS AND THE FIRST MARITIME ATLAS TO USE THE MERCATOR PROJECTION. Robert Dudley's "Secrets of the Sea" is "ONE OF THE GREATEST ATLASES OF THE WORLD and one of the most complex ever produced: it is the first sea-atlas of the whole world; the first with all the charts constructed using Mercator's new projection, as corrected by Edward Wright; the first to give magnetic declination; the first to give prevailing winds and currents. the first to expound the advantages of "Great Circle Sailing"; and . the first sea-atlas to be compiled by an Englishman." (Lord Wardington). Dudley's monumental work was the only exception to the total dominance of sea-atlas production by the Dutch for nearly a century. The complete work contained nearly 150 sea charts as well as dozens of illustrations and working diagrams. It was superior to any previous work in that the charts illustrated the whole world, the first time any outside of Europe had been included. His atlas was also the first to importantly show the prevailing winds, currents and magnetic deviation. In using the projection developed by Mercator, Dudley improved upon the theory of navigating by the "Great Circle," the shortest distance between two points on a globe. It was not until the eighteenth century that cartographers used the projection consistently, and during the prolonged period when the Dutch dominated cartographic production, not one atlas was published using it. This magnificently engraved work is an encyclopedia of seventeenth-century knowledge regarding the seas. Dudley was one of the more colorful and adventurous characters in the history of mapmaking. The illegitimate son of the Earl of Leicester and Lady Douglas Sheffield, but unable to establish his claim to the title of Earl of Leicester, Dudley left England in 1605. Arriving in Florence, Dudley entered the service of the Cosimo II, Grand Duke of Tuscany, as an engineer and naval commander. In 1646, Dudley published "Arcano del mare", the whole written in Italian by Dudley himself. The atlas was twelve years in the making, and the main innovation lay in its conception of a world atlas of charts, both general ocean charts and detailed surveys, covering all the rival spheres of European dominion: Spanish, English and Dutch. Dudley's sources included the original charts of Henry Hudson, and for the Pacific coast he used the observations of Henry Cavendish, the third circumnavigator of the globe and Dudley's brother-in-law. Bookseller Inventory # 72map22

21.

A FINE ALBUM OF PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE UNITED STATES.

ALLEN, William Shepherd, M.P. (1831-1915). WATKINS, Carleton Eugene (1829-1916) - SAVAGE, Charles R. (1832-1909) - BAGLEY, J.M. (fl.1880s) - JACKSON, William Henry (1843-1942) - KNOWLTON, W. (fl.1880s) - POLLOCK, Charles (fl.1880s), Photographers.
Bookseller: Arader Galleries
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Book Description: Ca 1880., 1880. Folio (16 4/8 x 12 inches). 66 albumen prints (4 x 6 inches; 7 4/8 x 4 6/8 inches; 12 x 8 inches; 10 x 13 inches), mounted on 19 heavier stock, the majority with manuscript captions on the mounts, some titled in the image with photographer's credits of C.R. Savage, J.M. Bagley, W.H. Jackson, W. Knowlton and Charles Pollock (mounts spotted, sometimes heavily, throughout). Original maroon blind-panelled morocco (extremities a bit scuffed, top corner of front free endpaper excised, a few leaves excised at the end). Provenance: with the ownership inscriptions of William Shepherd Allen (1831 - 1915), of Woodhead Hall, Cheadle, Staffordshire, England and "Allendale", Piako, Matamata, New Zealand, on the front paste-down. Including original photographs of San Franciso: the interior and exterior of the Palace Hotel, Montgomery Street; cable car crossing at Geary and Larkin streets; a view from the Residence, Senator Stanford; Market Street; China Town; California Street; Calaveras Grove; Residence of Charles Crocker (1822 - 1888), Southern Pacific Railroad executive; Mrs [Mary] Mark Hopkins residence, wife of the bookkeeper for the Central Pacific Railroad; Seal Point; The Golden Gate from Telegraph Hill; Arch Rock near St. Pinos Light House, Monterey California; the Mills residence in Milbrae [sic]. Also original photographs of views of the Nevada Fall Yosemite; Mount Hood from Portland, Oregon; Cathedral Rocks; Elcapitan; from the Mariposa Road; Agassiz Rock from Union Point; the Home Insurance Buildings in Chicago; Niagara Falls; Trinity Church, Brooklyn Bridge, Broadway, the Navaro [sic] Apartment House (also known as the Spanish Flats) New York; the Statue of Liberty; the entrance to New York; the Hudson River (?from Westpoint). There are also numerous souvenir photographs in and around Salt Lake City; the railroad through the Rocky Mountains; Colorado; Chicago; and New York. Allen was born in Manchester, and was actively involved in English politics as a Member of Parliament for Newcastle-under-Lyme from 1866 until he finally settled in New Zealand, in 1895. He had bought the first part of his Annandale estate in 1885 while visiting New Zealand, and the house, built in 1892, and the enlarged property provided for his sons, one of whom was Colonel Sir Stephen Shepherd Allen, in New Zealand. Allen later became involved in New Zealand politics at both the local and national level. It is possible that this photograph album records part of a return journey from New Zealand to England in the late 1880s. Bookseller Inventory # 72photo2

22.
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Book Description: Des Barres,, London:, 1779. Book Condition: Very good overall. Important, scarce Revolutionary era English copper plate engraved map of the Hudson Highlands in original color, showing troop, artillery and defensive positions, including the chains across the river, employed to control this key waterway in the struggle for independence. The most important early map of Philipstown, New York, with the first structure, the Davenport House, delineated. With an inset at the left side, tipped at an angle as is characteristic of Des Barres, titled "Part of the Hudsons River, Shewing the position of Fort Montgomery and Fort Clinton, with the Chevaux de Frieze, Cables, Chains & c. to obstruct the passage of HIs Majesty's forces up the River, by Lieut. John Knight of the Royal Navy, in 1777". The section of the Hudson River shown in the inset extends from 'Newberry' (Newburgh) in the north, to Anthony's Nose and Peek's Creek (unnamed) in the south; with Davenport's House located just south of 'Polipus I' (Pollepel Island) where the chevaux de frieze are shown spanning the river. The main map shows both the chain and the cable obstructing the river from Anthony's Nose on the east side to Fort Montgomery on the west. References lettered "a" through "o" beneath the title. Lower right corner restored, with some loss, otherwise very good. 31 1/2 x 21 1/2", archivally matted and framed in a gilt and red maple frame, 40 x 30 1/2".OCLC: 41183071; cites only 2 libraries worldwide that own this item. Bookseller Inventory # 16193

23.

HUDSON RIVER BRACKETED

WHARTON, Edith
(Henley on Thames, OXO, United Kingdom)
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Book Description: Appleton, 1929. First edition, UK issue. Original blue pebble grained cloth lettered in gilt to spine and upper cover in supplied yellow printed dustwrapper. The dedication copy, inscribed by the author on the dedication page, under the printed dedication (To A.J.H.S.), "from E.W. / December 1929". A very good copy with the gilt dulled and the rear hinge tender, dustwrapper in very good condition indeed with minor wear to the edges and a slightly toned spine. Housed in a quarter leather clamshell box. The dedicatee is John Hugh Smith, an American expatriate banker, art collector, francophile and literary devotee. When in around 1904 Edith Wharton became friends with Henry James, she joined a group of men who became known as her "inner circle" or, sometimes, "the happy few". This group included men of letters, artists as well as business men such as Hugh Smith. This group defined itself against the society its founders had left in the United States, while simultaneously criticising and accommodating the one it found in Europe. It existed parallel to but also as a transatlantic mirror of the Bloomsbury group. Bookseller Inventory # 23641

24.

Complete set (102 volumes) of Champlain Society publications.

CHAMPLAIN SOCIETY.
(Toronto, ON, Canada)
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Book Description: Toronto: 1907-2004., 2004. 102 Volumes, including the main series, the Hudson’s Bay Record Society series (12 Vols.), the Ontario series (16 Vols.), and the set of Champlain’s works (7 Vols.). all crested limited editions except for one volume of the Ontario series (Fort. Frontenac). 8vo. original cloth (a few volumes with staining to cloth, some spines faded). A cornerstone series for any serious collection of Canadiana. The set includes important early narratives relating to the exploration, fur trade, and early history and settlement of Canada. Some of these are first editions in English of major French sources, i.e. Samuel de Champlain, Nicolas Denys, Chrestien LeClercq, Pierre de La Verendrye, the Sieur de Dièreville, Gabriel Sagard, and François Du Creux. Other accounts include those of Marc Lescarbot, Samuel Hearne, John Knox, David Thompson, John Maclean, Patrick Campbell, James Colnett, Lord Selkirk, John Palliser, Alexander Henry, and Sir John Franklin. There are numerous volumes of documents relating to the North West and Hudson’s Bay Companies, others on the War of 1812, the 1837 Rebellion in Upper Canada, the diaries and papers of Simeon Perkins, Chief Justice William Smith, and Lord Minto, telegrams of the North-West campaign, &c. Bookseller Inventory # elala173

25.
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Book Description: Henry Gaugain, Lambert et Cie., Paris, 1826. Edition : First edition., rebacked expertly saving the original spine., 1826-28. The first edition of an outstanding series of American views. Milbert spent seven years in the United States, beginning in 1815, under the auspices of the Museum of Natural History in Paris. Milbert brought back to France the sketches from which the present lithographed views were made. It includes fine views of New York City (2), Long Island, Tarrytown, West Point (2), Hudson Falls (2), Albany (2), Saratoga Springs and Niagara (3) taken during Milbert?s travels in America between 1815 and 1822., Size : Folio (500 x 335mm)., Lithographed decorative pictorial title on buff paper, double-paged lithographed hand coloured map by H.Taquet dated 1826, side panels with list of plates. 48 (out of 54) superbly hand coloured lithographed views after Milbert by Deroy, Sabatier, Bichebois, V.Adam, Tirpenne, Joly and Villeneuve, on Indian paper mounted.It lacks the seven following plates (number 41, 44, 45, 48, 49, 51and 54)., Volume : Atlas volume only., References : Howes M592; Sabin 48916; Streeter 2, 910. minor marks on plates 21 and 34, printing flaw across bottom cover of plate 38 (a proof before title), occasional minor spotting in margins only, the images unaffected, Bookseller Inventory # B844

26.
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Book Description: London: H. Moll, T. & J. Bowles, P. Overton & J. King, [dated 1719, but circa 1730]. Copper-engraved map, on four joined sheets, with original outline colour, in excellent condition. 29 x 48 7/8 inches. A fine copy of Herman Moll's monumental and highly engaging world map, charted on Mercator's Projection This fascinating global perspective depicts the latest state of knowledge of the world in the first quarter of the eighteenth-century. The delineation of Europe, South America, and southern Asia is quite sophisticated, while the depiction of regions further beyond suggests only fleeting exploration or outright speculation. The map features the sailing tracks of various explorers including Henry Hudson, Thomas James, Willem Barents and the circumnavigation of Woodes Rogers. Most of the Arctic is labelled "Parts Unknown," and the American West is largely conjectural, featuring California as an island, the most beloved of cartographic misconceptions. Lands as depicted to the east of the Spice Islands are scarcely contemplated, "Iesso," or Hokkaido, is shown to be part of Siberia, and eastern Australia is left as a complete enigma, decades before the voyages of James Cook. This map was intended to satiate the intense English interest in maritime exploration and commerce. The oceans within the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn feature highly detailed hydrological information, most notably the direction of ocean currents, gleaned from Moll's esteemed contemporary Sir Edmond Halley. The inset to the upper left of the map features a diminutive world map depicting numerous lines of the degrees of compass variation. These calculations are, in part, based on measurements taken by Woodes Rogers during his transit across the Pacific, his individual readings being noted on the general map. An elegant circular inset in the lower left of the map depicts the Arctic regions as seen from directly above the Pole. This magnificent composition is further accentuated by the large title cartouche, which features personifications of the Old and New Worlds, enlivened by the most virtuous engraving. The present map was part of Herman Moll's magnificent folio work, a New and Compleat Atlas. Moll was the most important cartographer working in London during his era, a career that spanned over fifty years. His origins have been a source of great scholarly debate; however, the prevailing opinion suggests that he hailed from the Hanseatic port city of Bremen, Germany. Joining a number of his countrymen, he fled the turmoil of the Scanian Wars for London, and in 1678 is first recorded as working there as an engraver for Moses Pitt on the production of the English Atlas. It was not long before Moll found himself as a charter member of London's most interesting social circle, which congregated at Jonathan's Coffee House at Number 20 Exchange Alley, Cornhill. It was at this establishment that speculators met to trade equities (most notoriously South Sea Company shares). Moll's coffeehouse circle included the scientist Robert Hooke, the archaeologist William Stuckley, the authors Jonathan Swift and Daniel Defoe, and the intellectually-gifted pirates William Dampier, Woodes Rogers and William Hacke. From these friends, Moll gained a great deal of privileged information that was later conveyed in his cartographic works, some appearing in the works of these same figures. Moll was highly astute, both politically and commercially, and he was consistently able to craft maps and atlases that appealed to the particular fancy of wealthy individual patrons, as well as the popular trends of the day. In many cases, his works are amongst the very finest maps of their subjects ever created with toponymy in the English language. Shirley, Maps in the Atlases of the British Library I, T.Moll-4b, 2; Cf. Reinhartz, The Cartographer and the Literati: Herman Moll and his Intellectual Circle. Bookseller Inventory # 17937

27.

The Gentleman's Magazine: and Historical Chronicle. For the Year MDCCLXXIV [1774] [through] MDCCLXXXIII [1783] [Ten Volumes in Eleven].

American Revolution]. Urban, Sylvanus (ie. David, Henry), ed.
(East Jewett, NY, U.S.A.)
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Book Description: Printed at St. John's Gate for D. Henry 1774-1783, London, 1774. 120 issues plus 8 supplements as issued (no supplements issued in 1774 and 1783). 8vo. Full modern brown calf, five raised bands, red morocco spine labels, gilt titles and rules, in period style. Hardback. Illus. with 164 engraved portraits, figures, maps, and plans (75 folding, 1 facsimile) plus numerous in text drawings. Descriptions of every major event of the rebellion, every major battle of the ensuing war, every important letter, every major speech in Parliament, every major document including the Declaration of Independence. "Cave began the Gentleman's Magazine in January 1731, thus giving birth to one of the major publishing forms of the modern era, the magazine. It began modestly as a digest of London newspapers and periodicals for country customers (an orientation signaled in Cave's editorial pseudonym, Sylvanus Urban), but it went on to prosper and survive until 1922." (ODNB). Still using the name Silvanus Urban, Henry David, who succeeded as editor on Cave's death in 1754, and who was a first cousin of Patrick Henry of Virginia and a friend of Benjamin Franklin, added a special section starting in August 1774, entitled "Proceedings of the American Colonists, since the Passing of the Boston Port-Bill" which provided substantial coverage of the build-up and progress of the American Revolution with items previously published in the official government paper, letters from British officials in America, and reports from American newspapers and other sources, all with remarkable impartiality. Its influence on periodicals, newspapers, and magazines in general, and the British public's understanding of the American war in particular, cannot be overestimated. Beyond the American Revolution, the magazine reported extensively during these years on other issues and news concerning the British public, both domestically and internationally, from explorations, battles, public works, science, literature, philosophy, all providing a detailed picture of Great Britain and her people during this great upheaval. Each volume is difficult to find, and Revolutionary sets are rarely come by. Includes: Copies of early and sometimes the first British printings of the most important documents written in America (including but not limited to): 1. The Declaration of Independence,2. Resolves from the Provincial Meeting of Deputies 3. Resolutions of the Virginia Revolutionary Convention 4. Join or Die!- An Appeal to the People to unite in resisting the Parliament, and supporting Boston5. Suffolk Resolves6. Gage?s inflammatory Proclamation of June 12, 17757. Declaration and Resolves of the First Continental Congress 8. Address to the People of Great Britain9. Declaration on the Causes and Necessity of taking up arms 10. The Olive Branch Petition11. Letter to the Inhabitants of the Province of Quebec 12. The Definitive Treaty Between Great Britain and the United States of America (Treaty of Paris) Maps and Plans: 1. A Plan of the Town and Chart of the Harbour of Boston, in America (folding); 2. Plan of the Town of Boston, in America and a Map of the Country 100 miles round Boston (folding) 3. Map of Connecticut and Rhode Island, in America (folding); 4. Map of New York; showing the progress of his Majesty?s armies during the late campaign (folding); 5. A Map of Philadelphia and parts adjacent (folding)6. A Map of Hudson's River, America: 7. View of the Siege of Rhode Island, 1778 8. Chart of Delaware Bay and the River, as high as Philadelphia. Partial List of Actions covered:1. The Boston Tea Party 2. The Coercive Acts3. Early Disturbances4. First Continental Congress5. Formation of the Continental Association6. War Preparations7. General Gage Appointment8. Battle of Lexington and Concord9. Fort Ticonderoga10. Battle of Bunker Hill11. Expedition Against Quebec12. British Evacuation of Boston13. French Aid to America14. Independence Declared15. Battle of Long Island16. Occupation of New York18. Northern Campaign17. Articles of Confederation19. John P. Bookseller Inventory # 40390

28.

New York, from Governors Island , No. 20 of The Hudson River Portfolio

Wall, William Guy Hill, John; Smith, John Rubens Megarey, Henry J. & W.B. Gilley
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Book Description: Megarey, Henry J. & W.B. Gilley, New York, 1821. No Binding. Book Condition: Very Good. id#: 8A3303H Title: New York, from Governors Island , No. 20 of The Hudson River Portfolio Artist: Wall, William Guy, Engraver: Hill, John; Smith, John Rubens Publisher: Megarey, Henry J. & W.B. Gilley Year: 1821-1825 Medium: Aquatints -- Hand-colored Size: 16.5 x 22 inches; 36.8 x 54.3 cm. Description by Ilsoon Han Condition: slight browning in corner margin, one slightly chipped corner margin, great condition, very good colors, full margins, no tears or stains. The Hudson River Port-Folio contains twenty aquatints views of the Hudson River valley engraved by John Hill after paintings by William G. Wall. This is one of the finest set of views of the Hudson River ever published. The Hudson River runs 315 miles from the Adirondack Mountains to New York City. The views start near Lake Luzerne and end with a view of New York City from Governors Island. The original proposal was for twenty-four prints; however, only twenty were ever published between 1821 to 1825. William Guy Wall and The Hudson River Portfolio In the summer of 1820 the Irish-born and trained landscape artist William Guy Wall (1792-after 1864) went on an extended sketching tour of the Hudson River Valley and its environs. A selection of Wall's watercolors recording sights on his tour was engraved by the master printmaker John Hill (1770-1850) in The Hudson River Portfolio, published in New York City by Henry J. Megarey between 1821 and 1825. Long considered a cornerstone in the development of American printmaking and landscape painting, its twenty topographical views cover roughly 212 miles of the 315-mile course of the Hudson River. This undertaking paved the way for a wider public appreciation of landscape in the United States. The first series of prints to make Americans aware of the beauty and sublimity of their own scenery, the seminal Portfolio helped to stimulate national pride and cultural identity and was so popular that it was reprinted in 1828 by G. & C. & H. Carvill. It is no wonder that Wall is often seen as a forerunner of the first group of American landscape painters to focus on American subjects known as the Hudson River School. The Hudson River Portfolio follows the format of the well-established English picturesque touring itineraries featuring both images and text. All eight known extant watercolors preparatory for The Portfolio's aquatints are in the Society's collection. They are exhibited in this gallery, together with alternative views that were not reproduced as plates, nature studies by Wall, and a selection of independent impressions of the plates as well as a bound copy of the entire Portfolio. Like most eighteenth- and nineteenth-century books of engravings, The Hudson River Portfolio was issued serially in small groups of plates. According to the prospectus printed on the inside cover of the first number, the complete Portfolio was to be produced in six installments, each of which was to contain four aquatints and text written by John Agg. Bookseller Inventory # 8A3303H

29.
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Book Description: London: Macmillan and Co. 1879, 1879. 3 volumes, octavo. Original dark blue-green fine-bead-grain cloth, double-rule border and curved-edge panel in black on front cover and in blind on rear cover, lettering and publisher's device in gilt and decorative rules at top and bottom in black on spines, brown-coated endpapers, all edges untrimmed. Spines slightly rolled, some skilful repair to inner hinges, a very good copy. Parry's Public Library, Liverpool, labels to front pastedowns. Publisher's adverts dated May 1879 at end of vol. I. First English edition of James's début novel, published 11 June 1879, in an edition of 500 copies. James began the first novel he would acknowledge in Florence in spring 1874. It was serialized in Howells's Atlantic, then published in book form at Boston, November 1875, in an edition of 1,500 copies. It was thoroughly revised by James (removing, among other things, the chapter-titles, an experiment not to be repeated by him) after his move to London. The three volume London edition is rare. Edel & Laurence A3b; Supino 3.17.0. Bookseller Inventory # 72312

30.

RODERICK HUDSON

James, Henry Jr.
(Yarmouth, ME, U.S.A.)
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Book Description: 1879. [one of only 500 copies] In Three Volumes. Revised Edition. London: Macmillan and Co., 1879. 40 pp Vol I ads dated May 1879. Original dark blue-green cloth decorated in black. First English Edition (also the first edition to include the author's final revisions) of Henry James's first novel to be published. RODERICK HUDSON was initially published in Boston in November 1875 (dated 1876); it was preceded only by two collections of short pieces, A PASSIONATE PILGRIM and TRANSATLANTIC SKETCHES. As explained in the "Note" at the beginning of Vol. I, the reason the title pages read "Revised Edition" is that for this London edition the novel "has now been minutely revised, and has received a large number of verbal alterations. Several passages have been rewritten." In addition, the chapter titles were removed, and the thirteen original chapters were divided into 26.~There was only one printing in this three-decker format, and it consisted of a mere 500 copies. The copies appear in either of two nearly-identical binding variants (no priority); this copy is in E&L's variant "a", which is the taller variant (just over 7 1/2 inches) and has a wider "L" in the word "VOL.".~This is a bright copy, very good-plus: there is little external wear other than a few traces of wear along the vertical edges of the spines (as usual, since the spines bilk wider than the rest of the volumes); the lower front covers and the front endpapers bear faint evidence that labels/bookplates once resided there. In our opinion, RODERICK HUDSON is one of the scarcest of the Henry James multi-volume titles; this is only the second copy we have offered in our 30+ years. Supino 3.17.0; Edel & Laurence A3b. Bookseller Inventory # 12595

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